Connect with us

Community

SAAAACF Report Underscores Inequity in San Antonio

Published

on

Groundbreaking study offers in-depth look at the state of the local African American community

SAN ANTONIO — The local African American community continues to face a significant challenge in closing socioeconomic opportunity gaps as reflected by leading social indicators, according to a new study.

The groundbreaking new report, State of the African American Community in San Antonio and Bexar County, is a joint effort by the San Antonio Area Foundation (SAAFdn) and the San Antonio Area African American Community Fund (SAAAACF). It paints a thorough picture of how much work remains to be done to level the playing field for the local Black community – though recent initiatives are striving to reverse the trend.

We’re all well aware of the fact that our beloved city does suffer from socioeconomic disparity and this extensive report reflects this reality when it comes to the African American community

Marjie French

“We’re all well aware of the fact that our beloved city does suffer from socioeconomic disparity and this extensive report reflects this reality when it comes to the African American community,” said Marjie French, CEO of the Area Foundation. “That’s why we’re supporting nonprofits that address these challenges in order to help create a community where everyone has a chance to succeed.”

Toward that goal, the new community-led study – research conducted by Community Information Now – serves as a clarion call for all of us to think more about how we can help our fellow neighbors in need, said Bobby Blount, Chairman of the SAAAACF Board of Directors.

“This report does more than validate what most of us know: African Americans face many challenges in our community,” Blount said. “It provides a foundation for everyone to understand, discuss and take action to improve the livelihood of San Antonians.”

The research was based on various societal focus areas, selected by a 20-member community advisory committee. Some key findings:

• Population: African Americans comprise seven percent of Bexar County; about 20 percent of African Americans are military veterans; in about half of Black households where grandparents live with their minor grandchildren, those grandparents are raising their grandchildren.

• Housing: African Americans have the lowest rate of home ownership (41 percent); more than one-third (37 percent) of Black mortgage applicants are denied; overrepresentation in public housing (20 percent of all HUD-subsidized households).

• Education: Majority of Black students attend Judson ISD, Northside ISD and Northeast ISD; among all districts and charters, there’s overrepresentation in disciplinary alternative programs and out-of-school suspensions as well as in special education programs; underrepresentation in gifted and talented programs and Advanced Placement (AP) courses.

• Finance: African Americans have a lower median income ($48,509) than the county average ($57,157); nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of work-eligible African Americans are in the workforce; they are more likely than the county workforce overall to be unemployed (seven percent).

• Business: Only one percent of San Antonio-New Braunfels metro area businesses with paid staff and five percent of solo-run businesses are Black-owned.

• Health: About one in six (17 percent) working-age African Americans does not have health insurance and are also more likely to have medical debt in collections.

• Criminal justice: African Americans are overrepresented in police arrests as well as in criminal court cases; Blacks – along with Latinos – are the least to be released in cite and release cases for some misdemeanor offenses.

• Social connection: Majority of African Americans (83 percent) have broadband access but still trail other racial/ethnic groups; San Antonio is home to more than 200 Black churches with an average membership of 120 parishioners (excluding megachurches); about six percent of African Americans moved here from another Texas county or out of state.
The advisory committee, led by Blount, consulted with nonprofit advocacy organization Texas Appleseed to develop various policy recommendations to address the inequities highlighted in the report. Among the recommendations:

• Implement alternative methods of traffic law enforcement, including standardizing collection of metrics based on race and ethnicity.

• Invest in public defense to ensure those unable to retain counsel receive equal representation within the criminal justice system.

• Expand eligibility requirements for early education programs in order to enable Black children to be more kindergarten-ready.

• Create more opportunities for Black students to access Advanced Placement courses and gifted and talented programs.

• Expand paid internships as well as outreach programs to increase African American young adult participation in the workforce.

• Make more resources available and lift barriers impeding access to credit in order to increase financial stability for low-income African American households.

• Expand lending and support services to Black small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Though the new report leaves no doubt as to the tremendous challenge ahead, SAAFdn and SAAAACF are not sitting idle. A renewed focus on equity and social justice have led to the creation of strong and effective initiatives meant to close the opportunity gaps identified in the study. Some examples:

• Creation of the SAAAACF Social Justice Fund providing bail and legal aid to those facing low-level offenses.

• SAAFdn teaming up with UP Partnership on implementing Blue Meridian national funding leading to Youth Leadership Development and Workforce Development grants to nonprofits primarily focused on helping communities of color.

• SAAFdn supporting the Corporate Partners for Racial Equity coalition formed by top San Antonio business executives contributing more than $13 million into programs on equitable education, economic opportunities and social justice.

• SAAFdn partnership with the City of San Antonio/Metro Health providing grants to address health disparities exacerbated by the pandemic.

• SAAFdn launching its first-ever San Antonio Equity Fellowship Program, a unique professional development program to champion and help grow nonprofit leaders of color.

• SAAFdn partnering with Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) on the Leading To Change: Building Equity In Community Program focusing on equitable outcomes on affordable housing.

The report concludes with first-person “community voices” essays featuring local African American experts weighing in on the social indicators examined – each voice poignantly bringing to life the somber significance of the statistics. They are: Dr. Gary Bates, Dr. Adena Williams Loston, Ken Lowe, Dr. Travis Batts, Douglas Greene, Darryl E. Harris, Dr. Kenneth R. Kemp and Deborah Omowale Johnson.

Omowale Johnson, CEO and Director of the San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum, issued a critical reminder that the local Black community’s relatively small size doesn’t make it any less part of the diverse fabric of our great city.

“The Black community making up 7% of Bexar County may seem at first to be an insignificant group of people,” Omowale Johnson wrote. “However, if the community does not collectively recognize the impact of these statistics, the economic segregation gap will widen.”


About the San Antonio Area Foundation:
The San Antonio Area Foundation (SAAFdn) has served as the city’s community-giving headquarters for nearly 60 years, growing to become one of the top 20 community foundations in the nation. The Area Foundation helps donors achieve their charitable goals supporting our community’s greatest needs, managing more than 500 charitable funds nearly $1 billion in assets. Beyond serving hundreds of nonprofit organizations every year through training and grantmaking, where total impact exceeded $71 million in 2020, the Area Foundation operates a strong student scholarship program. Over $37 million has been invested in our future leaders since 1969 through more than 100 scholarship funds. Learn more at saafdn.org.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Community

Stork’s Nest Community Conversations

Published

on

By

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, Alpha Pi Zeta Chapter launches its Stork’s Nest Community Conversations program, with its first event on Feb. 18 at St. Philip’s College from 10 am to noon.  

Stork’s Nest Community Conversations will bring expectant mothers, their support groups, health and medical care experts, advocates, and government leaders together. Its purpose is to educate and engage on pregnancy and women’s health topics.  

March of Dimes 2022 Report Card depicts the need for collaborative work and innovative ideas to improve Texas preterm births. Texas’ preterm birth rate is 11.4% (D-). Bexar County and San Antonio’s preterm birth rates are 12.0% (F). The preterm birth rate among Black women in Texas is 41% –  higher than among other women. 

The Alpha Pi Zeta Chapter will host four Community Conversations throughout the year. On May 20, the topic is Learn How Legislation Affects You: Meet the Medical and Government Experts. On Aug. 19, the topic is Postpartum Education: What to Expect When You and Your Baby Come Home. And on Nov. 18, there will be a health fair, and a conversation on You are in Control: Health and Finances. 

The sorority’s Stork’s Nest 3.0 e-Learning Course also educates pregnant women to help improve birth outcomes and develop healthy lifestyles. Since 2021, the Stork’s Nest 3.0 e-Learning Course has enrolled 108 clients and has averaged an 86% graduation rate. The sorority partners with the Alpha Pi Zeta Foundation, the March of Dimes, the City of San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, African American Health Disparities Council.

The Feb. 18 Stork’s Nest Community Conversations will be in the Turbon Student Center on the 2nd floor of St. Philip’s (1801 Martin Luther King Drive). To learn more about future Community Conversations, just put Stork’s Nest Community Conversations in the search bar of Eventbrite.

Continue Reading

Community

Black History Events – Safe Spots for Black Motorists to IKEA Exhibit

Published

on

By

Black history is American history 365 days a year, and here are some events in February from the San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum (SAAACAM) to learn about African American influences and achievements. Located at La Villita (218 South Presa), the mission of SAAACAM is to collect, preserve and share the cultural heritage of African Americans in the San Antonio region. 

Feb. 7 from 10  am – 11 am – Story Time in the Park at the Hemisfair (434 S. Alamo Street). Each month young explorers learn and play around the theme of being different while being included. A short story is shared followed by a hands-on learning activity. 

Feb. 11 from 1 pm – 3 pm  – Black History River Tour (218 South Presa). Join SAAACAM on the San Antonio River for a 100-minute cruise exploring San Antonio’s Black history and the holiday lights that adorn the Riverwalk. The trip starts at La Villita, where it travels north through the Museum Reach to the Pearl, then back downtown to the Alamo, Convention Center and back to La Villita. Participants will be surprised at the continued African American influence in San Antonio.

Feb. 13 from 8 am – 10 am – Black Resistance at the Lunch Counter (IKEA Live Oak, Live Oak). SAAACAM and IKEA Live Oak celebrate the opening of the new exhibition at IKEA Live Oak “Black Resistance at the Lunch Counter,” with a complimentary breakfast. The exhibit will be available to the public for viewing from Feb. 13 through March 16. 

Feb. 22 from 2 pm – 4 pm – Green Book Historic Marker Unveiling (218 South Presa). View the locations of San Antonio’s Safe Spots for Negro Motorists during the Jim Crow era researched by students of the Texas A & M University-San Antonio, Methods of Historical Research Class (2022) led by Dr. Pamela Walker. This is a free event, but registration is required.

For more information about the different events and how to participate, visit (SAAACAM.org).

Continue Reading

Community

People of Color Increasing Pet Ownership

Published

on

By

By Melissa Monroe

I have a confession to make. When my son was 5 years old, I lied and told him our beloved dog, Simba, ran away. You see, Simba, a beautiful white spitz mix breed, wasn’t the fun-loving character like on Lion King. Instead, he was the vicious growling Cujo. 

Simba wanted to go everywhere with us when my daughter was born (when my son was 5). He was loving to the family, but no one could pet him. I mean, NO ONE! We would have to put him in a bedroom when someone wanted to visit. After 10 years, I had to make the hard decision to give him to San Antonio Animal Care Services

After that experience, I was traumatized from owning another pet but finally gave in when my two kids wanted a toy poodle. Mojo now is much different, though he has issues too. He does allow people to at least touch him. So why this long intro? Because, like many people of color, I didn’t want to be stereotyped as not being a good pet owner since I’m not white. In fact, Mojo gets his “hair done” more than I do. I even had pet insurance for him at one point. 

Pet owners like myself are fueling the billion-dollar pet industry. According to consumer market research company, Package Facts, the U.S. pet industry continued its strong advance in 2021, surging 14% overall to $123 billion. The company also reported that pets now live in 67 million U.S. households, and multicultural pet owners are a key reason. 

Hispanics, Asians, and African Americans are an influential and growing segment among owners of dogs, cats, and other pets. Compared to a decade ago, pet owners are now more likely to be a member of a multicultural population segment (28% in 2018 vs. 22% in 2008).

Another reason why I enjoy being a pet owner is because of the love pets show you. Mojo is the first to greet me at the door when I get home and never talks back to me (smile). A large majority of pet owners believe their pets have a beneficial impact on their emotional and physical health. 

We see evidence of that with the increasing demand for service dogs to help ease people with PTSD, autism, seizures, diabetes, and much more. Training for these working dogs can range in the tens of thousands of dollars, and many fail to become top-notch service animals. 

Atlas Assistance Dogs, an organization that trains people to be qualified dog trainers, estimates that there are 16,766 assistance dogs in the North America Region. But this number considers service dogs trained by ADI-accredited organizations. It doesn’t consider service dogs trained by their disabled owners. Atlas says it’s difficult to establish an exact number of service dogs in America. For example, ShareAmerica.com estimates about 500,000 service dogs in the US. 

Service dogs also have legal protection from discrimination. The U.S. Fair Housing Act requires homeowners and housing providers to provide reasonable accommodation for service dogs and not to discriminate. Under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA), airline operators in the US are required to accept service dogs as passengers and transport them on flights to, within, and from the United States. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) gives service dogs the right to access public areas and facilities. Operators of public facilities are required to admit them and their handlers without discriminating.

Pet ownership is also great for physical fitness. Researchers analyzed 29 studies published between 1990 and 2010, primarily in the United States and Australia. On average, 60% of dog owners walked 160 minutes per week and four times per week, a greater amount and frequency than people in dog-less households.

So while I miss Simba and think about everything I did to help him – expensive dog training and even having a psychic check him out – YES, I did that too; I’m grateful for the time I had with him and for knowing I did what I could to help him. Sharing a home with a pet is not cheap, but many benefits can be gained. 

Here are some more stats about multicultural pet owners 

  • Hispanics have become an especially significant part of the population of pet owners. The number of Latinos owning pets increased 44% from 15 million in 2008 to 22 million in 2018, a growth rate vastly greater than that experienced among non-Hispanic white pet owners.
  • Although a much smaller population, Asian pet owners grew at the same rate (45%) between 2008 and 2018.
  • During the same period, the number of African American pet owners also increased at a healthy rate (24%).
  • The impact of Latinos on dog or cat ownership has been especially pronounced. Over the past decade, the number of Hispanic dog owners increased by 59%. The number of Latino cat owners likewise increased by 50%.
  • The two most popular pets, dogs and cats, live in 39% and 24% of U.S. households, respectively. One in eight homes has other pets — including fish, birds, reptiles, or small animals such as rabbits, hamsters, or gerbils.
Continue Reading

Hot Topics