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Carver’s Jo Long Passes

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Some people leave such an indelible mark that their loss is a palpable absence for all who knew them. Jo Long Williams was one of them. In the days since her passing on Tuesday October 12, 2021 at the age of 71, so many individuals across so many different communities have paid tribute to her. While it is hard to find words to adequately honor someone whose life and legacy continues to have such far reaching impact, some that have been used most frequently this past week to describe her are visionary, legendary, beacon, generous, fierce advocate, force of nature, uncompromising, brilliant, activist, humble and so many more. 

The impact Jo Long Williams had in shaping the cultural landscape of our City and beyond cannot be overstated. Many have spoken of her visionary and transformative role as an arts administrator and advocate, of her supporting the early work and careers of so many artists, of bringing up a generation of cultural leaders and laying the framework for so many other cultural arts institutions to come into existence and thrive. Almost all have spoken of her fierce love of and commitment to community, representation, inclusion and equity. In the world of the arts, Jo Long is indeed legendary. However, this is just one aspect of her identity. She was also beloved by her family, circle of friends and faith community. Her life, legacy and loss are felt deeply by so many. 

Jo became the first executive director of the Carver Community Cultural Center in 1976…a position she remained in until 2000. Under her leadership throughout those two decades, the Carver Community Cultural Center became globally recognized as a leading cultural institution trademarked by Jo’s visionary multicultural programming and uncompromising commitment to equitable access for all. These hallmarks continue to be the guideposts by which the Carver carries on the work today.

Prior to coming to the Carver, Jo began her career at Southern Methodist University (where she had received her MFA in Music History) as founding director of the Community Center for the Arts Association from 1972 to 1976. Her legacy of service continued after her tenure at the Carver as well when she went on to serve as an administrator at the San Antonio College Christian Student Center.

She was preceded in death by parents, Samuel Aaron and Marie Thompson Long, grandmother Willie B. Williams and grandfather Clark Thompson. She is survived by husband Woodrow Williams and stepson Ryan, siblings Sammye Shelvin (Charles), June and Michael Long, niece Adrienne Scales (Brandon) and nephew Samuel Shelvin (Amber).

A memorial service in celebration of her life will be held in the theatre named in her honor at the Carver Community Cultural Center, 226 N. Hackberry St., San Antonio, Texas 78202 on Saturday, October 30, 2021, at 11:00 a.m.



In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Carver Community Cultural Center or Church of Christ Student Center. 

Memorial Service:     

Carver Community Cultural Center – Jo Long Theatre

226 N. Hackberry

San Antonio, Texas 78202

Saturday, October 30, 202111 AM

Art

Open Call: Calling All Artists

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The City of San Antonio’s Department of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Division is seeking applicants for the 2021 Public Art Pre-Qualified List for Artists and Support Services.

The Pre-Qualified List works as a roster of emerging and experienced individuals and organizations who are pre-qualified by City Council to work on designing, building, and promoting future projects within the Department of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Program.

We are seeking professional qualifications from area, state, national, and international artists and arts organizations as well as individuals and businesses that provide support services including, but not limited to, consulting, curating, writing, project management, art history, art handling and shipping, art appraising, restoring and conserving art, art fabrication and installation, photo and video documentation, graphic and web-based design, and technical design.

KEY DATES

·     Deadline to Apply: January 18, 2021 at 4:30 p.m. CT

·     Optional Virtual Informational Workshop: December 8, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. CT.

Register for the webinar here.

APPLY TODAY

All Open Call details and application instructions can be found at http://www.sanantonio.gov/arts/open

Applying for the Pre-Qualified List allows applicants to be selected for future projects, inclusion does not guarantee selection for a public art contract.

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African American History Via Black Dolls

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The National Black Doll Museum of History & Culture – the only museum in the country whose mission is to preserve the history of African Americans through the art and craft of Black dolls – will spend 2020 telling the story of beauty, culture and empowerment in its newest exhibit VIBE: Visions In Black Elegance. The exhibit features the 40th Anniversary of Black Barbie and a tribute to The Ebony Fashion Fair.

The exhibit opens in May with the annual Mother’s Day Tea held at Lombardo’s in Randolph, MA, commemorating the creation of the first Black Barbie doll by Kitty Black Perkins, this year guest speaker.

“Yes, She Does Come In Black!” This May, the museum will pull out all the high fashion stops (with over 300 Barbie’s…) to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the original Black Barbie doll. As we explore the creativity of her designer, Kitty Black Perkins, we’ll look at the significance of this groundbreaking doll. Why was a Black Barbie so important? How has she changed in the last four decades? And how has she changed the industry? This will truly be a series of exhibits not to be missed by any Barbie lover.

Continuing on the theme of elegance and style, The Museum will present “The Ebony Fashion Fair: A Retrospective.” Using our fashion dolls and a treasure trove of artifacts, we journey through sixty years of the famous and glamourous touring Ebony Fashion Fair and its innovative founder, Eunice Johnson. Highlights include life-size mannequins dressed in garments selected from the pages of Ebony magazine and recreated by local seamstresses, an affirmation wall where visitors can share their wisdom and “I SEE ME” – an immersive experience reminding us: representation matters!

So, immerse yourself this spring in empowerment and elegance. VIBE with us as we examine the lives of Kitty Black Perkins and Eunice W. Johnson, role models of Black women empowering themselves and others with visuals that showed the unmistakable truth: Black IS Beautiful!

About The Museum:
The National Black Doll Museum presented by the Doll E Daze Project Inc. has 5,000 dolls of color in their collection Located 35 miles south of Boston in Mansfield, MA. It is the first Black doll museum in New England, the second in the country, and the only doll museum in the world whose collection chronicles the history of African Americans through the eyes of a doll collector.

Learn more about the exhibit online at www.nbdmhc.org. It will be on display at the Museum, located at 288 N. Main Street in Mansfield, MA from May 12th – July 1st. A tea and reception is scheduled for Sunday May 10th from 11am to 4pm at Lombardo’s in Randolph, MA and will feature brief remarks by founder, Debra Britt, guest speaker Kitty Black Perkins, and others.

For more information, call (774) 284-4729 or visit the official web site at www.nbdmhc.org

For to purchase tickets, visit:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/barbie-mothers-day-teatalktribute-tickets-83611778079?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

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Houston Contemporary Dance Company In San Antonio

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Houston Contemporary Dance Company is a fresh, brand-new arts organization whose mission is to ignite passion for contemporary dance by providing world-class professional repertory concert performances and community engagement activities that are accessible to all regardless of race, culture, sexual orientation, gender, gender variance, or nationality. Led by founder and artistic director Marlana Doyle, and drawing from her over 17 years of curatorial experience, Houston Contemporary Dance Company, will present a vibrant and compelling inaugural season in 2020.

Houston Contemporary Dance Company aims to lead and innovate performing arts in Houston by drawing upon the director’s long tradition of inclusiveness and diversity within all facets of the organization.

Houston Contemporary sets itself apart by employing high caliber performing and choreographic artists from across the country. In setting high technical and artistic standards, Houston Contemporary will currently be the only contemporary repertory company to provide Houston audiences with opportunities to view works created by some of America’s most exciting dancemakers that speak to and are representative of the full spectrum of Houston’s diverse populace…all the while supporting talented Texas based artists as well. Houston Contemporary aims to be a vital component in not only keeping contemporary dance alive in Houston, but to firmly position Houston as a cultural center for dance by building broad participation and support for contemporary dance.

Houston Contemporary is coming to San Antonio’s Jo Long Theatre at the Carver Community Cultural Center on Friday, January 18, 2020 at 8PM. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by visiting Ticketmaster.com or the Carver Box Office (210) 207-2234.

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