Connect with us

Community

San Antonio Cooling Centers Open

Published

on

The City of San Antonio will open cooling centers throughout the City to provide respite from the high temperatures. Cooling centers will observe COVID-19 precautions, including screening, sanitation and social distancing guidelines.  

According to the Metro Health Heat Plan, the City is currently at a level III “heat advisory.” Under normal circumstances, cooling centers are not activated during Level III. Due to COVID-19 and fewer options for those individuals needing to seek shelter from the heat, the City is opening cooling centers sooner. 

Ten Department of Human Services operated Comprehensive Senior Centers will open today and while the heat advisory is in effect from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.  To provide additional cooling center locations, select Libraries will open tomorrow as cooling centers only from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Patrons seeking relief from the heat will be allowed to sit in designated areas and utilize Wi-Fi on their own devices. Browsing and computer use will not be available at this time. Beginning June 15, select City Park Community Centers will be open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Please see attached list of City of San Antonio cooling centers. 

In addition, the Department of Human Services, in partnership with Catholic Charities, is providing free box fans to community seniors through the Project Cool program.  Residents who would like to request a fan or have heat related resources, should call the United Way Helpline at 211.

With increasing heat, Metro Health reminds the community to take the following precautions:  

  • Spend time at home or locations with air-conditioning. Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death.  
  • Stay well hydrated, regardless of your activity level.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing and appropriate sunscreen.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Avoid heavy and/or hot foods—they add heat to your body.
  • Limit outdoor activities during the heat of the day. Exposure to full sunshine can increase Heat Index Values by up to 15°F.
  • Monitor those at high risk such as the elderly, infants, young children, and people who are ill or have chronic disease, such as heart disease or high blood pressure.
  • Do not leave children or pets unattended in a closed, parked vehicle.

For information about transportation options, please visit www.viainfo.net

Sunstroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely health effects resulting from heat and heat stroke is likely with prolonged exposure.  

Warning signs of heat stroke include: red, hot, and moistor dry skin, no sweating, a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse, nausea, confusion or acting strangely. If a child exhibits any of these signs after being in a hot vehicle, cool the child rapidly (not a nice bath but by spraying them with cool water or with a garden hose).Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Metro Health’s Heat Plan follows the national weather service levels. The format resembles a countdown, with Level IV stating a normal/routine condition and Level I representing a maximum readiness/excessive heat warning. The heat plan provides information on how individuals can prepare for, prevent, recognize, and cope with heat-related health problems. Additionally, the plan provides a list of local agencies, which will furnish heat-related assistance during extreme heat weather conditions. 

Community members can contact the National Weather Service for the most current weather conditions at 830-606-3617 or visit www.weather.gov/sanantonio for current hourly weather. Stay tuned for further notices.

2020 Cooling Centers

Site NameAddressPhone  Zip CodeDays and Times
Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior Center (District 6) 8353 Culebra Rd210.558.017878251Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Bazan Library2200 WEST COMMERCE STREET210.207.916078207 Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Bob Ross Senior Center2219 BABCOCK ROAD210.207.530078229Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Carver Library3350 COMMERCE STREET EAST210.207.918078220From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Claude W. Black/Eastside MSC2805 East Commerce Street210.207.5233 78202Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Collins Garden Library200 PARK BOULEVARD NORTH210.207.912078204Beginning 6/9 – 6/13&After 6/16/20 Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Copernicus Community Center5303 Lord Rd.210.648.107278220Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Cortez Library2803 HUNTER BOULEVARD210.207.9130 78224Beginning 6/16/2020Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Cuellar Community Center400 SOUTHWEST 36TH STREET210.207.315678237Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
District 2 Senior Center (Council District 2) 1751 S WW White Rd210.207.539078220Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
District 5 Senior Center (Council District 5) 2701 S Presa Street210.207.527078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Garza, Gilbert Park1450 Mira Vista210.207.727578228Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Hamilton Community Center10700 NACOGDOCHES ROAD210.207.312178217Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Johnston Library6307 SUN VALLEY DRIVE210.207.924078227From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Memorial Library3222 CULEBRA ROAD210.207.9140 78228From 6/9 – 6/13Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Miller’s Pond6175 OLD PEARSALL RD210.623.290078242Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Mission Library3134 ROOSEVELT210.207.2704 78214From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Normoyle Senior Center700 CULBERSON AVENUE210.207.565078211Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Northeast Senior Center4135 Thousand Oaks Dr210.207.459078217Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Palm Heights Community Center1201 WEST MALONE AVENUE210.207.309978225Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Pan American Library1122 WEST PYRON210.207.915078221Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Ramirez Community Center1011 GILLETTE BOULEVARD210.921.068178224Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Schaefer Library6322 US Hwy 87 E210.207.9300 78222 Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
South Side Lions Senior Center 3303 Pecan Valley Dr210.207.176078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Southside Lions Community Center3100 HIAWATHA210.207.315578210Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
West End Park Senior Center (Council District 1) 1226 NW 18th Street210.207.171978207Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Westfall Library6111 ROSEDALE210.207.922078201From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Willie M. Cortez Senior Center5512 W Military Dr210.207.529478242Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Advertisements
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Community

City Seeks Applicants For SA: Ready To Work Advisory Board

Published

on

The City of San Antonio is accepting applications for the SA: Ready to Work Advisory Board.  

In November, San Antonio voters overwhelmingly approved SA: Ready to Work, a training and education initiative to assist San Antonio residents impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic.  Last week, City Council approved the creation of a nine-member SA: Ready to Work Advisory Board to provide feedback on program objectives. 

“During the campaign this fall, voters asked how this initiative would incorporate diverse community feedback and remain aligned with business and resident needs. The timely creation of this board establishes a transparent and inclusive process from the start as City Council considers the various policies associated with this workforce and training initiative,” said Mayor Ron Nirenberg. “I encourage employers, participants and stakeholder organizations interested in playing a role in this important initiative to apply to serve.”

This Board will consist of representatives from four local employers with in-demand occupations, two current/previous participants in the City of San Antonio workforce development programs, one trade or labor organization, one community organization, and one workforce training provider. In additional, two City Council members appointed by the Mayor will serve as liaisons to this Advisory Board. 

Applications for the Advisory Board positions can be found at the City of San Antonio’s Board and Commissions website (https://www.sanantonio.gov/Clerk/Legislative/BoardsCommissions#13319780-apply-for-a-board). Applications will be reviewed for eligibility beginning in mid-January and forward to City Council for review and potential appointment. Potential applicants are asked to consider that no appointed members of this Advisory Board may have direct relationships with entities that contract with the City for implementation of the SA Ready to Work program.

SA: Ready to Work will be tax supported through a 1/8th cent sales tax. This education and workforce program would begin serving San Antonio residents in fall 2021 and extend through December 2025. Each year of the initiative, up to 10,000 residents will be served with a total of up to 40,000 residents served over the four years.

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Art

Open Call: Calling All Artists

Published

on

The City of San Antonio’s Department of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Division is seeking applicants for the 2021 Public Art Pre-Qualified List for Artists and Support Services.

The Pre-Qualified List works as a roster of emerging and experienced individuals and organizations who are pre-qualified by City Council to work on designing, building, and promoting future projects within the Department of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Program.

We are seeking professional qualifications from area, state, national, and international artists and arts organizations as well as individuals and businesses that provide support services including, but not limited to, consulting, curating, writing, project management, art history, art handling and shipping, art appraising, restoring and conserving art, art fabrication and installation, photo and video documentation, graphic and web-based design, and technical design.

KEY DATES

·     Deadline to Apply: January 18, 2021 at 4:30 p.m. CT

·     Optional Virtual Informational Workshop: December 8, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. CT.

Register for the webinar here.

APPLY TODAY

All Open Call details and application instructions can be found at http://www.sanantonio.gov/arts/open

Applying for the Pre-Qualified List allows applicants to be selected for future projects, inclusion does not guarantee selection for a public art contract.

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

CPS Energy Makes Move to New Headquarters on McCullough

Published

on

By

The boxes are packed, the moving trucks are here, and the first CPS Energy employees are officially moving to the utility’s new headquarters at 500 McCullough Avenue. While we will dearly miss our old home on Navarro Street, our big move signals a new era for us and the community we’ve loyally served for 160 years.

The old CPS Energy headquarters on Navarro Street are comprised of buildings that are 92 and 52 years old, respectively. The age of these buildings continually required escalating operating and maintenance costs to keep them safe and secure. Their sale will offset the cost of our new home and help us save money each year going forward. Once sold, the older buildings can be redeveloped by the next owner.

“The building is…attractive, but it’s affordable,” said Frank Almaraz, Chief Administrative and Business Development Officer, in an interview that took place on Sept. 11, 2020 with News 4 San Antonio’s Jaie Avila. “We focused very, very much on making sure that we were spending these dollars in the most prudent way possible. We think it’s going to be a fantastic place for us to base our operations out of. We are a 24/7/365 business that supports our community. In this time of COVID, everything’s just gotten a little more complicated, but we know one day we will welcome our customers to our facility and they will see that we have done the right thing for the community.”

Our new home will be more energy efficient and cost-effective.  It is 60% more efficient that our older headquarters and we paid special attention to things like using recycled wood to create tables and fixtures, as well as having fewer offices that would block natural sunlight. 

“Our customers are going to be better served with this new building with the lower cost that it takes to maintain it,” said Frank. “It’s 60 percent less energy intensive. With an [older building], everything is more expensive from an efficiency standpoint, but even just maintaining the exterior, it’s gotten so cost-burdensome that really the only responsible thing to do is to consolidate our employees into something that’s going to last us for many more decades [to come] and be more cost-effective.”

Once it is safe to return to the office, nearly 1,200 of CPS Energy’s 3,100 total employees will work at the new McCullough building, which will serve as a modest yet attractive addition to the Broadway corridor downtown and the downtown skyline. The total cost of the building will come in at $212 million, which is less than the company’s original budget allocation of $215 million. Significant care was taken to ensure that every monetary decision, even down to each piece of furniture in the building, was made with discretion and with the community in mind.

“The cost of furnishings is a small fraction of the total amount of the project itself,” said Frank. “We are taking over as much of the furniture that has an existing useful life in our current facilities…[but] it really is time for a refresh.”

Expenditures to our competitively selected furniture vendor represent only 3.4% of the total project costs. ($7.3 million for furniture / $212.0 million for the total spend = 3.4%).

From the very beginning when the project formally began in 2017, CPS Energy obtained public input to come up with three key principles in making our decision for our future headquarters selection:

  • Stay in the downtown area,
  • Ensure the cost of the new headquarters would not drive an increase in customer rates, and
  • Take the opportunity to spur economic development in the selected area of downtown.

“We watched every penny as though it was our own,” said Frank. “We know that, in the end, these are the dollars of our community and we were careful to only spend money that was cost-effective and prudent. I’m very comfortable with what the big team of people, who analyzed this to every penny, have produced and I think that we’ve been very, very reasonable.”

We are confident that, in the years to come, the new McCullough building will serve as a beacon to our community.

For additional information about CPS Energy’s new headquarters on McCullough, read this informational fact sheet. 

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Hot Topics