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San Antonio Cooling Centers Open

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The City of San Antonio will open cooling centers throughout the City to provide respite from the high temperatures. Cooling centers will observe COVID-19 precautions, including screening, sanitation and social distancing guidelines.  

According to the Metro Health Heat Plan, the City is currently at a level III “heat advisory.” Under normal circumstances, cooling centers are not activated during Level III. Due to COVID-19 and fewer options for those individuals needing to seek shelter from the heat, the City is opening cooling centers sooner. 

Ten Department of Human Services operated Comprehensive Senior Centers will open today and while the heat advisory is in effect from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.  To provide additional cooling center locations, select Libraries will open tomorrow as cooling centers only from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Patrons seeking relief from the heat will be allowed to sit in designated areas and utilize Wi-Fi on their own devices. Browsing and computer use will not be available at this time. Beginning June 15, select City Park Community Centers will be open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Please see attached list of City of San Antonio cooling centers. 

In addition, the Department of Human Services, in partnership with Catholic Charities, is providing free box fans to community seniors through the Project Cool program.  Residents who would like to request a fan or have heat related resources, should call the United Way Helpline at 211.

With increasing heat, Metro Health reminds the community to take the following precautions:  

  • Spend time at home or locations with air-conditioning. Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death.  
  • Stay well hydrated, regardless of your activity level.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing and appropriate sunscreen.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Avoid heavy and/or hot foods—they add heat to your body.
  • Limit outdoor activities during the heat of the day. Exposure to full sunshine can increase Heat Index Values by up to 15°F.
  • Monitor those at high risk such as the elderly, infants, young children, and people who are ill or have chronic disease, such as heart disease or high blood pressure.
  • Do not leave children or pets unattended in a closed, parked vehicle.

For information about transportation options, please visit www.viainfo.net

Sunstroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely health effects resulting from heat and heat stroke is likely with prolonged exposure.  

Warning signs of heat stroke include: red, hot, and moistor dry skin, no sweating, a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse, nausea, confusion or acting strangely. If a child exhibits any of these signs after being in a hot vehicle, cool the child rapidly (not a nice bath but by spraying them with cool water or with a garden hose).Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Metro Health’s Heat Plan follows the national weather service levels. The format resembles a countdown, with Level IV stating a normal/routine condition and Level I representing a maximum readiness/excessive heat warning. The heat plan provides information on how individuals can prepare for, prevent, recognize, and cope with heat-related health problems. Additionally, the plan provides a list of local agencies, which will furnish heat-related assistance during extreme heat weather conditions. 

Community members can contact the National Weather Service for the most current weather conditions at 830-606-3617 or visit www.weather.gov/sanantonio for current hourly weather. Stay tuned for further notices.

2020 Cooling Centers

Site NameAddressPhone  Zip CodeDays and Times
Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior Center (District 6) 8353 Culebra Rd210.558.017878251Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Bazan Library2200 WEST COMMERCE STREET210.207.916078207 Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Bob Ross Senior Center2219 BABCOCK ROAD210.207.530078229Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Carver Library3350 COMMERCE STREET EAST210.207.918078220From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Claude W. Black/Eastside MSC2805 East Commerce Street210.207.5233 78202Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Collins Garden Library200 PARK BOULEVARD NORTH210.207.912078204Beginning 6/9 – 6/13&After 6/16/20 Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Copernicus Community Center5303 Lord Rd.210.648.107278220Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Cortez Library2803 HUNTER BOULEVARD210.207.9130 78224Beginning 6/16/2020Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Cuellar Community Center400 SOUTHWEST 36TH STREET210.207.315678237Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
District 2 Senior Center (Council District 2) 1751 S WW White Rd210.207.539078220Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
District 5 Senior Center (Council District 5) 2701 S Presa Street210.207.527078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Garza, Gilbert Park1450 Mira Vista210.207.727578228Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Hamilton Community Center10700 NACOGDOCHES ROAD210.207.312178217Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Johnston Library6307 SUN VALLEY DRIVE210.207.924078227From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Memorial Library3222 CULEBRA ROAD210.207.9140 78228From 6/9 – 6/13Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Miller’s Pond6175 OLD PEARSALL RD210.623.290078242Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Mission Library3134 ROOSEVELT210.207.2704 78214From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Normoyle Senior Center700 CULBERSON AVENUE210.207.565078211Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Northeast Senior Center4135 Thousand Oaks Dr210.207.459078217Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Palm Heights Community Center1201 WEST MALONE AVENUE210.207.309978225Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Pan American Library1122 WEST PYRON210.207.915078221Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Ramirez Community Center1011 GILLETTE BOULEVARD210.921.068178224Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Schaefer Library6322 US Hwy 87 E210.207.9300 78222 Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
South Side Lions Senior Center 3303 Pecan Valley Dr210.207.176078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Southside Lions Community Center3100 HIAWATHA210.207.315578210Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
West End Park Senior Center (Council District 1) 1226 NW 18th Street210.207.171978207Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Westfall Library6111 ROSEDALE210.207.922078201From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Willie M. Cortez Senior Center5512 W Military Dr210.207.529478242Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
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SAAAACF Report Underscores Inequity in San Antonio

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Groundbreaking study offers in-depth look at the state of the local African American community

SAN ANTONIO — The local African American community continues to face a significant challenge in closing socioeconomic opportunity gaps as reflected by leading social indicators, according to a new study.

The groundbreaking new report, State of the African American Community in San Antonio and Bexar County, is a joint effort by the San Antonio Area Foundation (SAAFdn) and the San Antonio Area African American Community Fund (SAAAACF). It paints a thorough picture of how much work remains to be done to level the playing field for the local Black community – though recent initiatives are striving to reverse the trend.

We’re all well aware of the fact that our beloved city does suffer from socioeconomic disparity and this extensive report reflects this reality when it comes to the African American community

Marjie French

“We’re all well aware of the fact that our beloved city does suffer from socioeconomic disparity and this extensive report reflects this reality when it comes to the African American community,” said Marjie French, CEO of the Area Foundation. “That’s why we’re supporting nonprofits that address these challenges in order to help create a community where everyone has a chance to succeed.”

Toward that goal, the new community-led study – research conducted by Community Information Now – serves as a clarion call for all of us to think more about how we can help our fellow neighbors in need, said Bobby Blount, Chairman of the SAAAACF Board of Directors.

“This report does more than validate what most of us know: African Americans face many challenges in our community,” Blount said. “It provides a foundation for everyone to understand, discuss and take action to improve the livelihood of San Antonians.”

The research was based on various societal focus areas, selected by a 20-member community advisory committee. Some key findings:

• Population: African Americans comprise seven percent of Bexar County; about 20 percent of African Americans are military veterans; in about half of Black households where grandparents live with their minor grandchildren, those grandparents are raising their grandchildren.

• Housing: African Americans have the lowest rate of home ownership (41 percent); more than one-third (37 percent) of Black mortgage applicants are denied; overrepresentation in public housing (20 percent of all HUD-subsidized households).

• Education: Majority of Black students attend Judson ISD, Northside ISD and Northeast ISD; among all districts and charters, there’s overrepresentation in disciplinary alternative programs and out-of-school suspensions as well as in special education programs; underrepresentation in gifted and talented programs and Advanced Placement (AP) courses.

• Finance: African Americans have a lower median income ($48,509) than the county average ($57,157); nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of work-eligible African Americans are in the workforce; they are more likely than the county workforce overall to be unemployed (seven percent).

• Business: Only one percent of San Antonio-New Braunfels metro area businesses with paid staff and five percent of solo-run businesses are Black-owned.

• Health: About one in six (17 percent) working-age African Americans does not have health insurance and are also more likely to have medical debt in collections.

• Criminal justice: African Americans are overrepresented in police arrests as well as in criminal court cases; Blacks – along with Latinos – are the least to be released in cite and release cases for some misdemeanor offenses.

• Social connection: Majority of African Americans (83 percent) have broadband access but still trail other racial/ethnic groups; San Antonio is home to more than 200 Black churches with an average membership of 120 parishioners (excluding megachurches); about six percent of African Americans moved here from another Texas county or out of state.
The advisory committee, led by Blount, consulted with nonprofit advocacy organization Texas Appleseed to develop various policy recommendations to address the inequities highlighted in the report. Among the recommendations:

• Implement alternative methods of traffic law enforcement, including standardizing collection of metrics based on race and ethnicity.

• Invest in public defense to ensure those unable to retain counsel receive equal representation within the criminal justice system.

• Expand eligibility requirements for early education programs in order to enable Black children to be more kindergarten-ready.

• Create more opportunities for Black students to access Advanced Placement courses and gifted and talented programs.

• Expand paid internships as well as outreach programs to increase African American young adult participation in the workforce.

• Make more resources available and lift barriers impeding access to credit in order to increase financial stability for low-income African American households.

• Expand lending and support services to Black small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Though the new report leaves no doubt as to the tremendous challenge ahead, SAAFdn and SAAAACF are not sitting idle. A renewed focus on equity and social justice have led to the creation of strong and effective initiatives meant to close the opportunity gaps identified in the study. Some examples:

• Creation of the SAAAACF Social Justice Fund providing bail and legal aid to those facing low-level offenses.

• SAAFdn teaming up with UP Partnership on implementing Blue Meridian national funding leading to Youth Leadership Development and Workforce Development grants to nonprofits primarily focused on helping communities of color.

• SAAFdn supporting the Corporate Partners for Racial Equity coalition formed by top San Antonio business executives contributing more than $13 million into programs on equitable education, economic opportunities and social justice.

• SAAFdn partnership with the City of San Antonio/Metro Health providing grants to address health disparities exacerbated by the pandemic.

• SAAFdn launching its first-ever San Antonio Equity Fellowship Program, a unique professional development program to champion and help grow nonprofit leaders of color.

• SAAFdn partnering with Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) on the Leading To Change: Building Equity In Community Program focusing on equitable outcomes on affordable housing.

The report concludes with first-person “community voices” essays featuring local African American experts weighing in on the social indicators examined – each voice poignantly bringing to life the somber significance of the statistics. They are: Dr. Gary Bates, Dr. Adena Williams Loston, Ken Lowe, Dr. Travis Batts, Douglas Greene, Darryl E. Harris, Dr. Kenneth R. Kemp and Deborah Omowale Johnson.

Omowale Johnson, CEO and Director of the San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum, issued a critical reminder that the local Black community’s relatively small size doesn’t make it any less part of the diverse fabric of our great city.

“The Black community making up 7% of Bexar County may seem at first to be an insignificant group of people,” Omowale Johnson wrote. “However, if the community does not collectively recognize the impact of these statistics, the economic segregation gap will widen.”


About the San Antonio Area Foundation:
The San Antonio Area Foundation (SAAFdn) has served as the city’s community-giving headquarters for nearly 60 years, growing to become one of the top 20 community foundations in the nation. The Area Foundation helps donors achieve their charitable goals supporting our community’s greatest needs, managing more than 500 charitable funds nearly $1 billion in assets. Beyond serving hundreds of nonprofit organizations every year through training and grantmaking, where total impact exceeded $71 million in 2020, the Area Foundation operates a strong student scholarship program. Over $37 million has been invested in our future leaders since 1969 through more than 100 scholarship funds. Learn more at saafdn.org.

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MLK Day of Service

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Alpha Tau Omega Chapter, San Antonio’s local chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated celebrated the Sorority’s 114th Founding Anniversary with a day on and not a day off. For this year’s Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. service project they hosted a Community-wide Food and Winter Items Drive. Members collected can goods, non-perishable items, winter wear clothing (hoodies, gloves, jackets, etc.), and blankets. The ladies braved the cold and withstood the windy gusts Saturday morning. Their work was not in vain as they continue to be a service to all mankind.

Thanks to the donations from chapter members and the community, several hundred pounds of food as well as winter wear was collected and will be donated to support the San Antonio Food Bank and homeless street outreach efforts in San Antonio.

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Nation’s Largest MLK March Cancelled

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Due to the current influx of omicron cases in and around San Antonio, the city’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. March has been cancelled. The event was previously scheduled to take place on January 17th, but concerns for public safety and continued presence of the virus on the route led to its cancellation.

The MLK board met and made the decision Thursday night. The board will decide what they plan to include in next Monday’s meeting.

Renee Watson, who is the chairperson of the Martin Luther King march, says that COVID-19 testing will be available together with vaccine shots at Pittman Sullivan Park.

As of Thursday afternoon, the most recent update from DreamWeek says their events are still on but their plans are impromptu.

The in-person event, which had been held every year since 1987, was changed to a virtual event in 2020 at the start of the pandemic.

After over 20,000 diagnoses cases from the first week of the year, it makes sense to cancel a show for safety reasons.

Nathaniel Davis, past chair of Martin Luther King Junior March, died this week. We are saddened by his loss and extend our condolences to his family during this difficult time.

Stayed tuned to Black Video News for the latest statement and updates.

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