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New Book to Heal Broken Relationships Within Black Families

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21 Authors Collaborate on New Book to Heal Broken Relationships Within Black Families

Publisher and lead collaborator Monica D. Reed has released “I Am The Voice: Advocacy for the Voiceless,” a well-written collaboration of stories to bring awareness to breaking the barriers within families.

Nationwide — I Am The Voice: Advocacy for the Voiceless is the latest creation of publisher Monica D. Reed, an author, speaker, life coach, and a successful entrepreneur. This book is a powerful stand for the change of family, relationship, and social issues that need to be spoken on so that people can genuinely discover their true identity, purpose, and self-worth, achieve personal goals and move on to a life that is fulfilling and authentically by design.

 Am The Voice is an illuminating inspiration written for the readers to realize that everyone owns the potential to fulfill their life’s purpose after they have released the weight of their past. This book is a gentle reminder that no matter how bleak and terrifying the road may have seemed, success will be on the horizon when you discover your pain is now purpose. The book leaves the reader to strive to heal from the hurt and to create change, and begin to live a life full of love, unity, and legacy.

Author Monica shares insightful awareness of some of the challenges that we face within our families and community along with solutions to nurture and elevate the mind, body, and spirit. The book has brought awareness to how our past has truly impacted our lives, contributed to how we build relationships but also to examples of how we can use our story by turning obstacles into opportunities. The collaboration teaches you how to face the hurt of the past, heal the heart, use the journey of life to create purpose, and execute your goals. When you read this book, you will see that your obstacles do not define you and you will learn how to pursue your destiny on purpose.

Every page of I am the Voice is written with deep personal touch, such that anyone reading this book beginning from the front to back, or maybe one turn to any page and started reading from there, it does not matter; the messages that this book contains will touch the depth of one’s heart in numerous ways. The book features the bold voices of twenty-one different authors including Martha Davidson, Saniya I. Reed, Afrikus Hart, Felicia Brittingham, Chanel Spencer, Makeda-Armorer-Wade, Alfredia Fuller, Eugenia Yvette, Matthew Santana, Jr., Dr. Andrea Blue, Ph.D., Chantai Rae, Abisola Akinwande, and Tracy Young – all of whom are addressing past challenges and now sharing a victory. One must buy this book to get the taste of inspiration as words cannot describe the positive impact of the book. The book has been referred to as a “break-through in a book.”

I Am The Voice: Advocacy for the Voiceless is available for purchase on Amazon or directly from the publishing company at www.IAmTheVoiceBook.com

For more information about Monica Reed, the publisher and lead collaborator of this project, please visit www.MonicaDReed.com or follow her on Instagram @MonicaDReed

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Community

Diversity and Inclusion at Alamo Colleges

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By: Jose Macias Jr., D2, ACCD,

When people say things like the “system is broken” or “everything is fixed” – what they are really saying is that they have little faith or trust in the system. Instances of corruption, oppression, and a lack of accountability over the decades, have done little to restore confidence in government. Government seems to benefit those “who have” verse those “who have not.”

I have been addressing this issue for over ten years as an elected official. I won my first election in 2010 due to the climate of distrust in Judson ISD over a bond package that was mismanaged. A stadium renovation project that voters approved for 4 million dollars ballooned to over 10 million dollars. The construction company said that operational cost had increased since the bid as justification for the increase. It is something I never believed.

Anger in the community was off the charts, and as I began my work in trying to understand the process, I began to understand how the “system” was built. I also understood how linked bond and construction projects were directly tied to the classroom and to student success. Poor facilities meant that our students were not getting the very best environment to learn, and taxpayers were not getting what they paid for. As a school board member, I had to be diligent about understanding our construction strategies just as much as I had to be about our curriculum, teacher retention, and support programs.

In my role serving District 2, I can apply that experience to helping Alamo Colleges grow even stronger. Since it is all about student success, it is imperative we build an efficient system. During my first 100 days in office, I met with many minority business owners in D2 and asked them about their experiences in doing work for Alamo Colleges. Many of the responses were not kind. There was an overwhelming sentiment that we were not being inclusive of small minority businesses.

I recognized immediately the significance of this disconnect, and I committed then to help my district. I reached out to the Alamo Black Chamber of Commerce, The Hispanic Contracting Coalition, and the Fair Contracting Coalition (FCC) and began significant dialogue about creating inroads to greater inclusion of small minority businesses at Alamo Colleges.

Many hours and countless conversations have taken place across District 2 in preparing to take next steps to increase diversity and inclusion practices at Alamo Colleges. It is critical that our business partners reflect our community, and just as important that our tax dollars benefit businesses operating in our community as well.

Our data does reflect a strong record of utilizing minority businesses at Alamo Colleges, but our current course has not bridged the disconnect felt by a large group of minority business owners. With some modifications in our strategies and policies, we can bridge that disconnect.

The issue of diversity and inclusion is something that I know is important to my constituency, and if it is important to those I represent, then it is important to me. After all, the core of representative governance strongly implies that you must “Represent” and “Fight” for the community you serve. That is what I call “Truth.”

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Community

Sam Houston H.S. Has A New Principal

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Sam Houston High School in the San Antonio Independent School District (SAISD) has a new principal. Ms. Sharene Dixon has been named the new campus leader starting this 2020-2021 school year. Students, parents, teachers, community and stakeholders will have an opportunity to meet their new leader and participate in a virtual celebration this evening via Zoom. The Meeting ID: 964 2198 1219 Password: SHHS.

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Community

School Re-opening Update

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SAN ANTONIO, TX (July 15, 2020) – Following today’s announcement from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) that local public health officials that orderTexas schools closed for in-person instruction this fall will not risk state education funding, Metro Health with the support of the COVID-19 CommunityResponse Coalition will convene a task force to make local recommendations the public health authority for Bexar County.

“We’ve heard from many parents, teachers and administrators with concerns about starting the school year with in-person instruction while cases ofCOVID-19 are surging in Texas,” said Assistant City Manager and InterimMetro Health Director Dr. Colleen Bridger. “This task force will work together to help us make an informed decision about the best way to proceed with the health and safety of our children and all school staff as our highest priority.”

School districts typically fall under the authority of the State of Texas, not the City of San Antonio or Bexar County. However, the TEA has effectively given the authority to local communities to decide whether schools will open with in-person learning, rather than just remote learning.

The task force will include teachers, parents, students, teachers’ unions, school districts, universities, pediatricians and public health professionals. The task force will meet this week and will make recommendations about the safe reopening of schools in Bexar County. Updates will be shared at covid19.sanantonio.gov<http://covid19.sanantonio.gov/>.
FOUR WAYS TO SIGN UP FOR COVID-19 ALERTS
  1.  Download the Ready South Texas app, available in the iTunes<https://apps.apple.com/us/app/ready-south-texas/id1090438177> andGooglePlay<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.quickseries.BexarTX&hl=en_US> stores  

2.  Text COSAGOV to 55000 to receive SMS text message updates  

3.  Follow @COSAGOV on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  

4.  Bookmark covid19.sanantonio.gov

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