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An Epic Journey

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TWO ST. PHILIP’S COLLEGE FACULTY MEMBERS MAKE HISTORY AS TEXAS’ FIRST ALUMNI OF THE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP FOR INTERNATIONALIZING CURRICULUM FELLOWS PROGRAM AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY

SAN ANTONIO ––-About 400 St. Philip’s College students and dozens of colleagues of SPC social and behavioral science faculty members Andrew Hill and Irene Young made history together in the multidisciplinary field of global and international studies this year.

Young and Hill have been giving back since August of last year as uniquely focused members of the Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum (EPIC) Fellows Program for the 2018-19 academic year at Stanford University. 

SPC’s Young and Hill were both included when the selective, competitive 10-Fellow program with a global focus expanded beyond California for the first time in 2018. Now they are alumni of Stanford’s premiere program for bringing together and supporting faculty members committed to developing global and international studies.

And the benefit of globalism awareness is being shared more effectively with hundreds of students and dozens of colleagues in Texas. St. Philip’s College and San Jose City College were each represented with two Fellows in the 2018 cohort at Stanford. Mission College, De Anza College, College of Marin, Mission College, Grossmont College and Pasadena City College were each represented with one Fellow in the unique 2018 cohort. 

Hill and Young each have years of separate outstanding track records for inspiring colleagues while teaching philosophy and psychology in ways that inspire global thought to about 400 of the 13,000 students enrolled each year at 121-year-old St. Philip’s College. They began their fellowship year by processing their respective fellowship offers. The duo formally ended their timeline of weekly real-time phone meetings with Fellows at Stanford after giving separate presentations during the university’s 2019 EPIC Symposium held in May at Stanford. In between time and going forward as EPIC alumni, Hill and Young have been strategically enriching the abilities of both students and colleagues beyond the college through two diverse, synergistic focuses on globalization.

In a dual-purpose approach, Young and Hill studied and completed projects focused on what it means to internationalize and promote global competencies among both students and faculty at St. Philip’s College. They studied organizational behavior. They read strategically on international and cross-cultural education and how they can use both to help online and physical students. As they continued to network with members of the 2018 cohort of Fellows, Hill and Young were infusing their students in the classroom—and their faculty colleagues in professional development events in Texas—with sustainable new approaches to thinking globally.

In California, both of the efforts of the first Fellows in Texas were best-practice topics on the challenges and opportunities of developing the global studies culture with research-based innovative plans and strategies during the 2019 EPIC Symposium. Young and Hill were also members of two separate EPIC Fellow Project Panels held concurrently at the start of that symposium.

“Mr. Hill and I previously worked together worked on a St. Philip’s College and Alamo Colleges District study abroad program for Northern Ireland, and also in bringing Fulbright Scholars from that region to our college,” Hill said. “I have worked as a family life specialist for the Air Force… in Turkey, Belgium, Israel… it was an eye and mind opening experience. I wanted our students to have that same opportunity—but in a different way—and EPIC has become one of the ways,” Young explained.

Young’s previous academic experience also includes teaching students in the European and Mediterranean divisions of four-year colleges. In her current capacity within a department that annually builds the knowledge of 3,500 social sciences students, Young’s annual regular course load at the HBCU is anywhere from 170-200 students. She felt that sharing one of her impactful personal globalization experience stories with the Fellow selection team was one factor in her co-making history along with Hill.

“I met a family being forced off their land while I was serving in Turkey. One of the women in the family… she literally tried to give me a nine-month-old child of the family. From there, I knew she saw the world in a different way than I did,” said Young.

“Working within the Global Studies Division at Stanford… we were looking at how we can better incorporate global studies curriculums at community colleges that teach the majority of college students in this nation. In my recent social psychology course at my community college, my students were looking at how issues could be addressed from a global perspective. To make our world a better world. To think beyond the state level to the issues that are worldwide issues,” said Young. “I’ve also done study abroad as a faculty member, and I’m sharing that there are proposals available from EPIC to encourage community college students from Texas to study in Europe in extension with Stanford. The aspiration is for our students at St. Philip’s College to apply to visit the Stanford campus in Florence,” said Young.

“On our EPIC journey this year, we wanted to inspire our students to want to be in the room when a Fulbright Scholar arrives at St. Philip’s College, to visit that Stanford campus in Florence, to enroll in our classes… We’re helping our students to appreciate the perspectives and worldview of others, arousing their curiosity to make a difference when many of them have not had opportunities to travel and learn about other places,” said Young, adding, “World peace begins with learning about and understanding one another.”

To join the conversation on education through globalization at St. Philip’s College, contact Hill at ahill76@alamo.edu and Young at iyoung@alamo.edu. (Archival Images: Courtesy SPC and Courtesy Stanford-Michael Breger)

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Blacks pay higher security deposits, more application fees

Renters of color pay security deposits more often than white renters, and the deposits they pay are typically $150 higher.
Black and Latinx renters report submitting more applications than white and Asian American and Pacific Islander renters. The typical white or Asian American and Pacific Islander renter submits two applications, while the typical Black or Latinx renter submits three.

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Renters of color pay higher security deposits, more application fees

Results from Zillow’s Consumer Housing Trends Report show renters of color typically submit more applications — and pay more in application fees — before they secure a place to live than white renters do. Renters of color also typically pay a higher security deposit when they move in.

The U.S. rental market is as competitive as it’s been in decades, with the national vacancy rate lower than at any time since 1984.ii Rent prices have skyrocketed, up a record 17% in just the past year, prompting some priced-out renters to look for a more affordable home when their lease expires. About 9 in 10 renters paid a security deposit last year, with the typical deposit coming in at $700. A higher share of renters of color paid a deposit (93%) than white renters (85%), and the median amount paid by renters of color was higher, too — $750, compared to $600.

“Rents grew more last year than any year on record, forcing many renters to look for a more affordable option. About 2 in 5 renters who moved in the past year said a rent hike influenced their decision to move,” said Manny Garcia, population scientist at Zillow. “Renters typically do not have much of a financial cushion, and the cost of finding a new place to live can be an expensive burden. Regrettably, renters of color are especially likely to experience rising rents, and when they shop for a new rental, generally report higher upfront costs, restricting the mobility that is often held up as a benefit of renting.” 

A $750 security deposit represents a significant amount of a typical renter’s wealth. Zillow’s research indicates a typical renter holds $3,400 total across savings, checking, retirement and investment accounts. More than one-third (38%) of renters surveyed say they couldn’t cover an unexpected expense of $1,000.

In addition to facing higher and more frequent security deposits, renters of color report submitting more applications and paying higher fees for those applications than white renters. In 2021, 61% of all renters applied for two or more properties — an 11-point increase from 2019 and five points higher than in 2020, likely owing to the tight rental market. The typical white or Asian American and Pacific Islander renter submits two applications, while a Black or Latinx renter typically submits three. More than one-third of renters of color submit five or more applications during their home search: that’s true of 38% of Black and Latinx renters, 33% of Asian American and Pacific Islander renters, and only 21% of white renters.

With a median rental application fee of $50, the cost can add up quickly if renters need to apply for several properties. The burden is often greater for renters of color, who report paying a higher median application fee than white renters, on top of usually needing to apply to more rentals. Among renters who paid an application fee for the home they rent, the typical white renter reports paying $50, while a typical Black renter paid $65, a typical Latinx renter paid $80 and a typical Asian American and Pacific Islander renter paid $100.

The higher fees and number of applications for renters of color are likely partially attributable to their age, income and geography. The typical renter of color is two years younger than the median white renter, meaning two fewer years of potential income growth. White renters are also more likely to rent in rural markets and the Midwest, both of which are generally less expensive. Asian American and Pacific Islander and Latinx renters, in particular, are more likely to rent in the West, which includes many of the country’s most expensive and competitive rental markets.

Expanding access to credit could help improve outcomes for Black and Latinx renters. Nearly half of white renters (46%) say they were completely certain they would qualify for a rental, compared to 38% of Latinx renters and 34% of Black renters. Credit checks are part of many rental applications, and Black and Latinx adults are more prone to being credit invisible and more often live in counties with higher levels of credit insecurity.

Renters looking to reign in application fees may have options. For a flat $29 fee, renters can use Zillow’s online rental application to apply through Zillow for an unlimited number of participating properties within 30 days. The online application includes a credit report and background check, which saves landlords time while screening prospective tenants and provides them with the information needed to feel confident about each applicant. Renters can also offer additional context and explain any negative items on their rental and credit history.

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Selma, Texas #1 for African Americans

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If you live in the Bexar Metro area consider moving to Selma.

Over one in every 10 people in San Antonio is African American. However, the US Census only documents individuals who responded to the mailed survey during the pandemic. Since 2017 to 2021, over 30,000 new black people moved to San Antonio.  These numbers can be deceiving if you don’t understand the geographical overview of the city.

Selma is also the highest average individual income out of the 14 cities. At $44.704, Selma has the highest average monthly personal income at $3,884.

Selma Texas has risen from third to first place in percentage (24.7%) of blacks. Converse, Texas (22.2%) has stayed the same in ranking at number two, while Live Oak, Texas (18.6%) has jumped ahead of Lackland Air Force Base (18.5%) to grab the #3 spot. San Antonio’s percentage dropped from 9th to 10th percent for the Bexar County metro area. Across all areas of the county, there has been an overall growth of 12% in African Americans.

Bexar Metro Black Populations

Selma24.7
Converse22.2
Live Oak18.6
Lackland AFB18.5
Kirby18.0
Cibolo16.3
Schertz11.5
Universal City9.1
Windcrest9.0
San Antonio6.8
Leon Valley6.2
Timberwood Park4.2
New Braunfels1.8
Boerne1.0
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Blavity Inc. Moves Nation’s Largest Black Tech Conference, AfroTech to Austin, TX

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Blavity Inc., the diversified digital media company behind AfroTech, 21Ninety, Travel Noire, Shadow and Act, and Blavity News, announced the relocation of the AfroTech Conference – the nation’s largest tech conference for Black innovators and founders – to Austin Texas. AfroTech 2022 will take place November 13-17, 2022 at the Austin Convention Center and surrounding venues located in the heart of Austin.

AfroTech Conference 2022 will be filled with the signature pillars you’ve come to know from AfroTech – exclusive programming, the world’s top Black innovators, sought-after networking, and for the first time, a new live music series extension all with the mission to bring Black disruptors together for connection, career development, and entertainment.

“After 2 years in the Metaverse we are thrilled to be back together in person in Austin. As our attendees have continued to grow from 650 attendees at our Inaugural AfroTech to 20,000 annual participants, we searched for a host city that is accessible to our diverse audience and provides the infrastructure for the vibrant experiences and connection we craft for our attendees. Austin is that home. I can’t wait to see everyone in person in November to learn, make connections and revel in the Black excellence that has become a hallmark of our AfroTech experiences” says CEO, Morgan DeBaun.

Blavity has made incredible investments in the leadership of our AfroTech team to ensure they are building a best-in-class experience for their community. Jeanne Procope, the VP of Conference Operations & Strategy, joins the team with 15+ years of experience in the conference & events business and reports into an expanded organization under Gautam Ranji, Blavity Inc. Chief Operating Officer, who has led the operational and strategic vision for Viacom, CBS, and Hearst.

To purchase your tickets for the 2022 AfroTech Conference, please visit https://www.experience.afrotech.com/afrotech-conference and to stay up to date on speaker and entertainment announcements, follow @afro.tech on Twitter.

ABOUT BLAVITY INC.
Blavity Inc. is a technology and news media company, founded in 2014 around a simple idea: enable Black millennials to tell their own stories. Today, we are home to the largest network of platforms and lifestyle brands serving Black millennials & gen-z through original content, video and unique experiences. The company has grown into a market leader for Black media, reaching over 100 million millennials per month through our growing brand portfolio which includes: Blavity News, 21Ninety, AfroTech, Travel Noire, Shadow & Act, and Blavity TV.

Journalists interested in covering the event may apply for credentials here. Please note, an application does not guarantee entry.

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