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JUNETEENTH FREEDOM DAY PROJECT

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ST. PHILIP’S COLLEGE INVITES ALL TO JOIN IN ITS FAMILY-FRIENDLY 2019 JUNETEENTH FREEDOM DAY PROJECT

SAN ANTONIO (May 22, 2019)–––As the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States, Juneteenth Freedom Day is considered a special event project on the timeline of a college that was originated in 1898 for the daughters of former U.S. slaves.

All are welcome to join St. Philip’s College students as participants in the college’s 2019 Juneteenth Freedom Day project. The highlight of the SPC project involves marching with the college’s students in the local parade that celebrates the event—the Juneteenth Freedom Parade—June 15 at 10 a.m., beginning Sam Houston High School at 4635 E. Houston St., and ending at Comanche Park #2 at 2600 Rigsby Ave.

For details on the project, email jmartin139@alamo.edu or rguerrero@alamo.edu.

Juneteenth Freedom Day is a widely recognized celebration of the moment 154 years ago (June 19, 1865) when more than 200,000 enslaved persons in Texas found out that they were both free and independent from being considered as someone else’s property. One-hundred-fifty-three years is slightly more than half of San Antonio’s 301-year existence as a city, meaning Juneteenth—and slavery—and freedom—has more than a few deep roots in one of the nation’s largest states. 

The march is the signature element of the college’s engagement with the local organizers of the Juneteenth Parade. It began getting into early gear for the last two years when the parade organizers ran into a few issues scheduling the parade close to the actual date of Juneteenth.

When the nation’s first Juneteenth parade of the 2018 season took place June 2 in San Antonio, rather than the projected June 16 date, the college had two weeks to organize its 2018 participation early and appropriately. 

As in year’s past, the college’s 2019 Juneteenth project will be confirmed in coming weeks with at least a single day of family friendly activity and engagement, and the parade is once again announced to be aligned with the actual week that Juneteenth is observed nationwide.

Celebrations public and private began once the final reading of the proclamation on the ending of slavery in the United States occurred in Galveston have enjoyed continuity in North America, for freedom from living as property in legal and commercialized concentration camp-like conditions in a country where freedom is foremost is worth celebrating. Descendants of the enslaved in other parts of the Western Hemisphere where slavery thrived or was frowned upon commemorate similar human events with exhibitions or Juneteenth-like events for the intellect—and for human unity in avoiding such atrocities of the past.

A co-organizer of the 2018 project, Paul Lede is the college’s coordinator of student success.

“We all wore our college anniversary shirts and were waving out the window and honking the horn in our van when the students inside the van decided to get their Juneteenth Freedom Day message closer to the people. Most people in the parade were in cars, and once we got halfway there in vans our students decorated by hand, the students said, ‘We want to walk,’ explained Lede. “After they got out of the vans, our students gave kids beads as they walked in front of the Sam Houston High School Band, and our contingent included Collegiate 100 chapter, honor society and student government members. The students were creative. They took time to decorate our van with beads, ribbons and banners in our college blue and white colors, so people knew it was us,” said Lede.

The college will welcome all to join its contingent in the 2019 Juneteenth Freedom Parade lineup June 15. For full details on the college’s observance to include partnering in or scaling up college participation, service and excellence, contact college Juneteenth Freedom Day program co-chairs John Martin(director of student conduct and Title IX programs) at jmartin139@alamo.edu and Ruben Guerrero (senior multimedia specialist) at rguerrero@alamo.edu.

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Art

Carver’s Jo Long Passes

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Some people leave such an indelible mark that their loss is a palpable absence for all who knew them. Jo Long Williams was one of them. In the days since her passing on Tuesday October 12, 2021 at the age of 71, so many individuals across so many different communities have paid tribute to her. While it is hard to find words to adequately honor someone whose life and legacy continues to have such far reaching impact, some that have been used most frequently this past week to describe her are visionary, legendary, beacon, generous, fierce advocate, force of nature, uncompromising, brilliant, activist, humble and so many more. 

The impact Jo Long Williams had in shaping the cultural landscape of our City and beyond cannot be overstated. Many have spoken of her visionary and transformative role as an arts administrator and advocate, of her supporting the early work and careers of so many artists, of bringing up a generation of cultural leaders and laying the framework for so many other cultural arts institutions to come into existence and thrive. Almost all have spoken of her fierce love of and commitment to community, representation, inclusion and equity. In the world of the arts, Jo Long is indeed legendary. However, this is just one aspect of her identity. She was also beloved by her family, circle of friends and faith community. Her life, legacy and loss are felt deeply by so many. 

Jo became the first executive director of the Carver Community Cultural Center in 1976…a position she remained in until 2000. Under her leadership throughout those two decades, the Carver Community Cultural Center became globally recognized as a leading cultural institution trademarked by Jo’s visionary multicultural programming and uncompromising commitment to equitable access for all. These hallmarks continue to be the guideposts by which the Carver carries on the work today.

Prior to coming to the Carver, Jo began her career at Southern Methodist University (where she had received her MFA in Music History) as founding director of the Community Center for the Arts Association from 1972 to 1976. Her legacy of service continued after her tenure at the Carver as well when she went on to serve as an administrator at the San Antonio College Christian Student Center.

She was preceded in death by parents, Samuel Aaron and Marie Thompson Long, grandmother Willie B. Williams and grandfather Clark Thompson. She is survived by husband Woodrow Williams and stepson Ryan, siblings Sammye Shelvin (Charles), June and Michael Long, niece Adrienne Scales (Brandon) and nephew Samuel Shelvin (Amber).

A memorial service in celebration of her life will be held in the theatre named in her honor at the Carver Community Cultural Center, 226 N. Hackberry St., San Antonio, Texas 78202 on Saturday, October 30, 2021, at 11:00 a.m.



In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Carver Community Cultural Center or Church of Christ Student Center. 

Memorial Service:     

Carver Community Cultural Center – Jo Long Theatre

226 N. Hackberry

San Antonio, Texas 78202

Saturday, October 30, 202111 AM

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Community

Joe Webb Sr. passes away

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Joe Webb Sr. Longest serving SATX politician D2 Councilman passes away

On Saturday, September 17, 2021 Joe Webb Sr passed away at Metropolitan Methodist Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. Born in Beeville Texas in in 1935. It was in Beeville that Mr. Webb learned the value of community. He graduated from High School in 1952 and married Frances Dee Toliver in 1953. In 1955 Joe Webb Sr moved back to San Antonio. He began his work at the YMCA in 1957. During these years Joe Webb began to understand the power of higher education and what it could mean for his family financially. He attended San Antonio College and St. Mary’s University.

HEB

In the late 1960’s Joe Webb Sr. began his career with HEB. Charles Butt traveled from Corpus Christi Texas to personally hire Joe Webb Sr. In 1969 he entered the HEB Managerial program. He then became the manager of several HEB grocery stores. Most notably the first African American to manager HEB store #1 and the East Side flagship HEB on N. New Braunfels.

DISTRICT 2

Joe Webb’s relationship with San Antonio’s East Side began with his employment at the YMCA. There he met and networked with many of the city’s movers and shakers. They were impressed with his ability to effectively communicate and express the needs of the people within his neighborhood. It was here that he was encouraged to use his gift to seek greater employment opportunities and political office. Joe Webb’s campaign began as all grass roots campaigns do. The use of family and friends to make phone calls and knock on doors, he spoke at various Church’s and public gathering. Soon his idea of a bigger and more dynamic East Side caught on and in 1977 the East Side cast their ballots for Joe Webb Sr as their representative City Councilman for District 2. Mr. Webb would retain this seat through many elections, finally ending his City Council career in 1991. Those years between 1977 and 1991 were years of great change not just for the East Side but for the City of San Antonio at large. Joe Webb served on the City Council with names are we are still familiar with today. His contemporaries included former San Antonio Mayor and United States HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros, former TX St. Representative, Senator, Mayor and currently Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff as well as former Mayor and Author Lila Cockrell.

PRIDE IN THE EAST SIDE

While in and out of office, Joe Webb used his name and clout to support and encourage many East Side causes. He owned and operated his own grocery store on the East Side. He was an early supporter of the MLK celebration, and he helped to secure the Alamodome.  He has been awarded numerous times for his contributions to San Antonio. In 1992 The City of San Antonio renamed Durango Bridge the Joe Webb Bridge. In 1995 Ruth Jones McClendon read into the City Council minutes a proclamation honoring Joe Webb Sr. for his service to the community. 2016 saw then Councilman Alan Warrick II award Joe Webb Sr. the Lifetime Achievement Award and in 2017 the Bexar County Historical Society interviewed and entered his biography into their official database. Joe Webb Sr. was a Minister of the Gospel, a lifetime member of the NAACP as well as a Grand Master of the Masonic Masons.

ELDER STATESMAN

In 1999 Frances Webb passed away and Joe Webb Sr, became a widow. He later married current wife, Mrs. Barbara Webb. The couple remained an active part of the community and Joe Webb Sr. continued to engage in East Side politics through speaking engagements and support of various District 2 candidates and Councilpersons.

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Community

Johnson & Johnson Vision Announces New Collaboration to Eliminate Inequities

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− New collaboration with Black EyeCare Perspective sets sights to drive more equity among eye care professionals in optometry

− First major eye health company to sign 13% Promis

Johnson & Johnson Vision*, a global leader in eye health and part of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies**, today announced a collaboration with Black EyeCare Perspective, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to redefining the color of the eyecare industry 1% at a time. As part of the collaboration, Johnson & Johnson Vision signed the 13% Promise, an initiative to increase equity and representation in the eye care industry and in optometry schools by increasing the number of Black students to mirror the 13% of Black people in the U.S. population.

Click to Tweet: .@JNJVision announces new collaboration to increase representation of people of color in the eye care industry and colleges of optometry. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3k9iv5C

According to data from Black EyeCare Perspective, only 3.2% of students and 3.8% of faculty in optometry colleges are Black or African American, and this number drops to only 1.8% among practicing optometrists. Johnson & Johnson Vision is the first major eye health company to sign the 13% Promise, furthering a long-standing commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion through awareness, education, and empowerment in collaboration with associations, public and community organizations.

Johnson & Johnson Vision will contribute to the 13% Promise by continuing to:

  • Support sponsorships and new programs to improve representation of people of color in optometry.
  • Bring more diversity and equity into the eye care industry.
  • Create more culturally relevant information and eye health education materials.

“As one of the largest eye health companies, we have an opportunity to drive change and bring more diversity, equity and inclusion in our industry for the greater good of the many patients and doctors we serve,” said Thomas Swinnen, President, North America, Johnson & Johnson Vision***. “Our partnership with Black EyeCare Perspective is one of the many ways we can further support the future of optometry and work together to create quality, equitable experiences along with healthier outcomes across communities.”

To learn more about Johnson & Johnson Vision visit www.jjvision.com.  

About Johnson & Johnson Vision*
At Johnson & Johnson Vision, part of Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, we have a bold ambition: to change the trajectory of eye health around the world. Through our operating companies, we deliver innovation that enables eye care professionals to create better outcomes for patients throughout their lives, with products and technologies that address unmet needs including refractive error, cataracts and dry eye. In communities with greatest need, we work in collaboration to expand access to quality eye care, and we are committed to helping people see better, connect better and live better. Visit us at www.jjvision.com. Follow @JNJVision on Twitter and Johnson & Johnson Vision on LinkedIn.

About Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies**
At Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, we are helping people live their best lives. Building on more than a century of expertise, we tackle pressing healthcare challenges, and take bold steps that lead to new standards of care while improving people’s healthcare experiences. In surgery, orthopedics, vision and interventional solutions, we are helping to save lives and paving the way to a healthier future for everyone, everywhere.

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