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San Antonio Cooling Centers Open

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The City of San Antonio will open cooling centers throughout the City to provide respite from the high temperatures. Cooling centers will observe COVID-19 precautions, including screening, sanitation and social distancing guidelines.  

According to the Metro Health Heat Plan, the City is currently at a level III “heat advisory.” Under normal circumstances, cooling centers are not activated during Level III. Due to COVID-19 and fewer options for those individuals needing to seek shelter from the heat, the City is opening cooling centers sooner. 

Ten Department of Human Services operated Comprehensive Senior Centers will open today and while the heat advisory is in effect from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.  To provide additional cooling center locations, select Libraries will open tomorrow as cooling centers only from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Patrons seeking relief from the heat will be allowed to sit in designated areas and utilize Wi-Fi on their own devices. Browsing and computer use will not be available at this time. Beginning June 15, select City Park Community Centers will be open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Please see attached list of City of San Antonio cooling centers. 

In addition, the Department of Human Services, in partnership with Catholic Charities, is providing free box fans to community seniors through the Project Cool program.  Residents who would like to request a fan or have heat related resources, should call the United Way Helpline at 211.

With increasing heat, Metro Health reminds the community to take the following precautions:  

  • Spend time at home or locations with air-conditioning. Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death.  
  • Stay well hydrated, regardless of your activity level.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing and appropriate sunscreen.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Avoid heavy and/or hot foods—they add heat to your body.
  • Limit outdoor activities during the heat of the day. Exposure to full sunshine can increase Heat Index Values by up to 15°F.
  • Monitor those at high risk such as the elderly, infants, young children, and people who are ill or have chronic disease, such as heart disease or high blood pressure.
  • Do not leave children or pets unattended in a closed, parked vehicle.

For information about transportation options, please visit www.viainfo.net

Sunstroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely health effects resulting from heat and heat stroke is likely with prolonged exposure.  

Warning signs of heat stroke include: red, hot, and moistor dry skin, no sweating, a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse, nausea, confusion or acting strangely. If a child exhibits any of these signs after being in a hot vehicle, cool the child rapidly (not a nice bath but by spraying them with cool water or with a garden hose).Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Metro Health’s Heat Plan follows the national weather service levels. The format resembles a countdown, with Level IV stating a normal/routine condition and Level I representing a maximum readiness/excessive heat warning. The heat plan provides information on how individuals can prepare for, prevent, recognize, and cope with heat-related health problems. Additionally, the plan provides a list of local agencies, which will furnish heat-related assistance during extreme heat weather conditions. 

Community members can contact the National Weather Service for the most current weather conditions at 830-606-3617 or visit www.weather.gov/sanantonio for current hourly weather. Stay tuned for further notices.

2020 Cooling Centers

Site NameAddressPhone  Zip CodeDays and Times
Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior Center (District 6) 8353 Culebra Rd210.558.017878251Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Bazan Library2200 WEST COMMERCE STREET210.207.916078207 Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Bob Ross Senior Center2219 BABCOCK ROAD210.207.530078229Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Carver Library3350 COMMERCE STREET EAST210.207.918078220From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Claude W. Black/Eastside MSC2805 East Commerce Street210.207.5233 78202Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Collins Garden Library200 PARK BOULEVARD NORTH210.207.912078204Beginning 6/9 – 6/13&After 6/16/20 Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Copernicus Community Center5303 Lord Rd.210.648.107278220Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Cortez Library2803 HUNTER BOULEVARD210.207.9130 78224Beginning 6/16/2020Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Cuellar Community Center400 SOUTHWEST 36TH STREET210.207.315678237Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
District 2 Senior Center (Council District 2) 1751 S WW White Rd210.207.539078220Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
District 5 Senior Center (Council District 5) 2701 S Presa Street210.207.527078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Garza, Gilbert Park1450 Mira Vista210.207.727578228Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Hamilton Community Center10700 NACOGDOCHES ROAD210.207.312178217Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Johnston Library6307 SUN VALLEY DRIVE210.207.924078227From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Memorial Library3222 CULEBRA ROAD210.207.9140 78228From 6/9 – 6/13Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Miller’s Pond6175 OLD PEARSALL RD210.623.290078242Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Mission Library3134 ROOSEVELT210.207.2704 78214From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Normoyle Senior Center700 CULBERSON AVENUE210.207.565078211Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Northeast Senior Center4135 Thousand Oaks Dr210.207.459078217Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Palm Heights Community Center1201 WEST MALONE AVENUE210.207.309978225Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
Pan American Library1122 WEST PYRON210.207.915078221Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Ramirez Community Center1011 GILLETTE BOULEVARD210.921.068178224Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Schaefer Library6322 US Hwy 87 E210.207.9300 78222 Beginning 6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m.-7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
South Side Lions Senior Center 3303 Pecan Valley Dr210.207.176078210Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Southside Lions Community Center3100 HIAWATHA210.207.315578210Mon – Fri7:30 a.m. –5:30 p.m.
West End Park Senior Center (Council District 1) 1226 NW 18th Street210.207.171978207Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Westfall Library6111 ROSEDALE210.207.922078201From 6/9 – 6/13&Beginning  6/16/20Tue: 12 p.m. -7 p.m.Wed – Sat10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Willie M. Cortez Senior Center5512 W Military Dr210.207.529478242Mon – Fri7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
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One of the Brothers: Alamo City Black Chamber of Commerce’s New Chairman

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The Psi Alpha Chapter, known to most in the city as the “Alamo City Ques” is proud to call Brother Gregory Thompson, a 1979 initiate of the Sigma Delta Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated, one of their own.  Brother Thompson was recently appointed Chairman of the Alamo City Black Chamber of Commerce.  Established in 1938, the Alamo City Black Chamber of Commerce provides a conduit between the City of San Antonio, its agencies, and other governmental entities to foster economic empowerment for businesses and individuals in San Antonio. 

The Chamber’s emphasis is to be part of the economic activity, promote jobs, training, and business referrals to businesses and organizations.  As a member of the board, Bro. Thompson leads a team of 11 advocating for African American businesses in the Greater San Antonio Metropolitan Area.  In addition to his outstanding work serving the community, Bro. Thompson is also the Founder of “Omega Speak,” a newsletter distributed monthly to the Brothers of Psi Alpha Chapter.

Congratulations Mr. Thompson on your new role!

For more information about the Alamo City Black Chamber of Commerce please visit https://alamocitychamber.org/ or https://alamocitychamber.org/.

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Tyler Perry to Pay for Funeral of 8-Year Old Girl Killed Near Site of Rayshard Brooks’ Death

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Nationwide — Filmmaker Tyler Perry is back with more generosity. He will reportedly be paying for the funeral expenses of Secoriea Turner, an 8-year old girl who was fatally shot on July 4th near the Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was killed by Atlanta police.

According to Atlanta police, Secoriea was fatally struck by gunfire as she sat in the backseat of her mother’s car. Her mother immediately drove her to the hospital where she was pronounced dead.

He told People, “I’m outraged today because I’d rather be paying for 8-year-old Secoriea Turner’s college than her funeral. When does this end?”

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms also spoke out saying, “An 8-year-old girl was killed last night because her mother was riding down the street. If Secoriea was not safe last night, none of us are safe.”

“You shot and killed a baby,” she continued. “And there wasn’t just one shooter, there were at least two shooters.”

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Principal Change At Sam Houston H.S.

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By LaNell Taylor

Some may call it déjà vu, but unfortunately the situation is not rumored but rather it is true. The leadership at Sam Houston High School is changing once again.  Last, week an article was published in a local newspaper and much chatter took place via social media that Dr. Mateen Diop, Principal at Sam Houston High School would no longer serve as the school’s principal at the start of the 2020 – 2021 school year. The announcement came as a surprise to some while others applauded the SAISD board’s decision.  It is believed that the decision was solidified following the class valedictorian’s graduation speech that vilified the school, Dr. Diop and his administrative team.

Not much has been shared from either party (SAISD nor Dr. Diop); however, SAISD Board of Trustee Alicia Perry did offer the following statement:

We will have a change in leadership at Sam Houston High School next school year. These changes are always made with students in mind and their best interests at heart. We value the community and will ensure that stakeholder input is considered as we search for a new leader. We will strive hard to ensure that the campus moves in a positive direction. We take the concerns of our students seriously and we want to ensure that they have a successful learning environment. District Administration will review the concerns in an effort to ensure that they are addressed appropriately.” 

As an alumna of Sam Houston High School in the San Antonio Independent School District, a former teacher of the school, a parent of a Sam Houston athlete, a tax payer in the District, I personally know that the stability of leadership at Sam Houston H.S. has been on shaky ground for at least almost two decades now.  When I taught there from 2001-2006 we had 5 principals (Donald McClure, Joanne Cockrell, John Simpson, Joanne Cockrell again, and Melanie Iglehart – Hammonds) in the five years that I was there and unfortunately that cycle of the forever changing leadership hasn’t changed much since then; therefore, making it a very systemic problem and not good for kids.

Again, not many details have been released as to why this current principal change has occurred, but for many outsiders looking in, we are in an awaken state of looking at the systematic failures of organizations and institutions that have failed Blacks (particularly Black men).  I just believe folks need to make sure history isn’t repeating itself.  In speaking to other individuals, a former principal, mentor, and friends of mine, it was expressed that if I were to dig deeper I would probably uncover evidence of suppression of Black men in SAISD. Immediately in my mind I reflected back to the likes of Mr. Donald McClure; Mr. Everett Fuller; Mr. Charles James; Mr. Lewis Barr; Mr. John Simpson; Mr. Derrick Cade; Mr. Darnell White; Mr. Stanton Lawrence; and Dr. Mateen Diop and wondered what adversities they may have faced within the system.

To all who have walked in the shoes of educators they know “Teaching Ain’t Easy” and sometimes it is not for everyone. Again, I am not defending nor agreeing with anyone on the matter; however, I know that “Great Leaders” are important, but no one leader should EVER stop a show. If ALL parties (parents, students, community, principals, administrators, board members, stakeholders, etc.) TAKE RESPONSIBILITY and are doing their part within an institution, despite the efforts of whomever the principal is, SUCCESS WILL PREVAIL! I’m part of that proof. As I mentioned earlier, I taught at Sam Houston H.S. when we had 5 principals in five years; however, as a campus we were still able to perform and on some occasions even outperform other schools in and out of the District to include areas of academics, athletics, graduating children., etc.

People should also consider that in most school systems today, most principals don’t run campuses like the days of old. Administrators, Vice Principals, Assistant Principals, Academic Deans, Counselors, etc. are the day to day faces we encounter because principals are like CEOs, they are often required to attend meetings and trainings at the District office, on and off campus, in the community, out of the city and state, perform classroom and campus walkthoughs, manage construction, manage budgets, and lets not forget those infamous “other duties as assigned.” I say all that to say that it should not be a surprise that at many campuses individuals are confused as to who is running the campus.

In closing, I’d like to note that when I worked at other schools in SAISD principal turnovers were just as frequent then as they are today, and I never understood how that was good for kids. Much can be said about schools that have or had consistency in leadership.  Shouts out to Mr. Charles Muñoz former Principal at Edison H.S. who served for two decades or more; Ms. Raquel Sosa, former Principal, Highland Hills Elementary in the 80s, and two of my current favorite principals Mrs. Natasha Pinnix of M.L. King Academy and Dr. Derrick Thomas of St. Philip’s Early College High School. Much can be said for their leadership and track records.

I challenge all to look at ALL the data in order to make best decisions.  And please let the good outweigh the bad.

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