Connect with us

Community

San Antonio Leads Effort to Protect Military Bases in Texas

Published

on

San Antonio once again has showed its commitment to being Military City, USA, as Maj. Gen. Juan G. Ayala (USMC Retired), director of the city’s Office of Military and Veterans Affairs, stepped into his role as the president of Texas Mayors of Military Communities.

Ayala was designated by Mayor Ron Nirenberg to serve on the advocacy group on behalf of San Antonio, and later elected president by members of Texas Mayors of Military Communities (TMMC).

“This appointment is evidence of the great partnership and support the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs provides under the leadership of Maj. Gen. Ayala to not only San Antonio, but to Texas as well,” Mayor Nirenberg said. “As Military City, USA, we are proud to join forces with other Texas cities to protect our military bases.”

TMMC is a nonprofit consisting of 13 cities, including Abilene, Austin, Corpus Christi, Del Rio, El Paso, Fort Worth, Houston, Killeen, Kingsville, San Angelo, San Antonio, Texarkana and Wichita Falls. The group was formed to advocate at the State Capitol for policies and funding that benefit Texas bases. The 15 bases in Texas represent approximately $101 billion per year in annual economic impact for Texas, while employing several hundred thousand men and women in both military and civilian roles.

“As the largest employer in the region, the military is a priority for the city of San Antonio,” City Manager Sheryl Sculley said. “In addition to investing more than $90 million in infrastructure since 2009 to support our bases and developing regulations that ensure compatible land use, we see it as our responsibility to advocate for the military when they cannot do so themselves.”

One priority for TMMC has been grant money for the Defense Economic Assistance and Adjustment Grants (DEAAG) program. In each of the past three years, the San Antonio area has successfully applied for DEAAG grants totaling nearly $15 million. Funds are used to connect San Antonio’s installations to the San Antonio Water System, acquire private property in the Accident Protect Zones adjacent to Randolph Air Force Base and construct a high-tech building at Port San Antonio to house cybersecurity operations.

“Military missions are not only a part of the culture and history of Texas communities, but are also integral to state and local economies,” Ayala said. “We are committed to uniting military communities to preserve and promote the military installations in Texas. I’m honored to serve in this position and further our efforts to protect Texas military bases.”

The group has been successful in securing more than $50 million in state grant funding that has been leveraged by local governments throughout Texas to enhance the military value and missions of its bases.

Advertisements

Community

Former Longhorn Benson dies

Published

on

By

AUSTIN, Texas — Former NFL and Texas Longhorns running back Cedric Benson, one of the most prolific rushers in NCAA history, has died in a motorcycle crash in Texas. He was 36.

Benson’s attorney, Sam Bassett, said Austin law enforcement told him that Benson was killed in the wreck Saturday night. Bassett said he did not have details about what happened.

“Cedric was not just a client, he was my friend,” Bassett said. “He was immensely talented and fierce on the football field, yet most have no idea the difficulties he overcame to achieve what he did. Though imperfect in some respects, once Cedric was your friend you understood how kind, sensitive and loyal he was as a man.”

Benson was one of the top high school recruits out of the West Texas town of Midland. According to Texas Football magazine, he is eighth on the career rushing list for Texas high schools. He led Midland Lee to three straight state championships, the only three in school history, from 1998 to 2000.

He then went on to be a key player in the Longhorns’ resurgence under coach Mack Brown. Benson played at Texas from 2001 to ’04, and his 5,540 yards ranks second at the university behind Ricky Williams’ total and ninth in NCAA history. He scored 64 career touchdowns with the Longhorns and won the Doak Walker Award, given to the nation’s top running back, in 2004.

He was the only player in school history to rush for at least 1,000 yards in four seasons and was inducted into the school’s Hall of Honor in 2014.

Brown and Williams took to social media to pay tribute to Benson after learning of his death.

Tom Herman, the current coach at Texas, also expressed his condolences.

“It’s an unbelievably sad day with the news of the passing of Cedric Benson,” Herman said in a statement. “We lost a true Longhorn Legend, one of the best running backs in college football history and a really special man. He was far too young, and my heart aches for his family, friends and the entire Longhorn community. Our thoughts and prayers are with them all.”

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

S.A.’s First African American Federal Judge

Published

on

Courtesy of U.S. District Court (WD Texas) and Whitehouse Judicial Nominees websites.

Judge Jason Pulliam, TSU Thurgood Marshall Alum – First African American to Serve on U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas

Published on August 11, 2019

Jason K. Pulliam, a class of 2000 graduate of Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law, made history August 9, 2019, when he was sworn in by Chief U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia as the First African American to serve on U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, since it was established by Congress on February 21, 1857. It is one of ninety-four U.S. District Courtsthat presides over general trials in the United States federal courts. The court convenes in San Antonio but has divisions in Austin, Del Rio, El Paso, Midland, Pecos, and Waco.

Tom Reel, Staff / Staff photographer/SA Express-News

U.S. Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Ted Cruz (R-TX) recommended Judge Pulliam to President Donald Trump as a candidate to the fill a vacancy on the Western District of Texas Court. OnMarch 5, 2019, President Donald Trump (R) nominated Judge Pulliam and on April 3, 2019, the U.S. Senate voted 51-48 in favor of a change to chamber precedent lowering the maximum time allowed for debate on executive nominees to district court judgeships. Judge Pulliam was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy on July 31, 2019, by a vote of 54-36. He received his commission on August 5, 2019.

Federal Judge Nominee, Jason Pulliam at Senate Judiciary Committee Nomination Hearing

 Judge Pulliam’s legal career began immediately after graduating from law school. He honorably served as a Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Marines, as a Staff Judge Advocate from 2000-2004. Following his military service, Judge Pulliam worked as an attorney for William “Bill” Ford at the law firms of Ball & Weed, P.C. and Ford & Massey, P.C. His distinguished judicial career began in 2011, as Judge for the Bexar County Court at Law No. 5 (San Antonio), until 2015. In January 2015, former Governor Rick Perry appointed Judge Pulliam as the First African American man to serve as a Justice on the Texas Fourth District Court of Appeals (San Antonio), from 2015 to 2016. Most recently, he was Of Counsel with Prichard Young PLLC, a product liability and business/commercial litigation firm, from 2017 to 2019. He has represented clients before various Texas courts, U.S. District Court for Western District of Texas, Eastern District of Texas, and Southern District of Texas.

Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law (founder in 1946)

 Judge Pulliam earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from City University of New York and a Juris Doctor degree from Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law. He holds active memberships in various legal, civic, and professional organizations. Congratulations Judge Pulliam on your lifetime appointment to the federal bench.

Information provided in this article was compiled from San Antonio Express-News, Ballotpedia, U.S. District Court (WD Texas), and Whitehouse Judicial Nominees websites.

Dr. Reginal D. Harris, a Law Clerk for the Law Offices of Bell & White, PLLC, in San Antonio, Texas. He is a 2018 graduate (honors) of Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law. Dr. Harris completed two judicial externships at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas under Senior Federal Judge Kenneth M. Hoyt; an externship with the Innocence Project at the Earl Carl Institute of Legal & Social Policy Inc.; a criminal and civil clerkship at Roberts Markland PLLC law firm; and an public service internship at Lone Star Legal Aid of Houston Inc. (Military and Veterans Unit).

Published By

Reginal D. Harris, JD, PharmD, RPh, CPh, cMTM

Reginal D. Harris, JD, PharmD, RPh, CPh, cMTM

“Education is the greatest equalizer to attaining success.” -My Grandma, Mrs. Judie A. Belvin

Follow

Jason K. Pulliam, a class of 2000 graduate of Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law, made history August 9, 2019, when he was sworn in by Chief U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia as the First African American to serve on U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, since it was established by Congress on February 21, 1857.

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

Not Angry, Empowered

Published

on

The Black Women’s Leadership Alliance (BWLA) held an exciting breakfast and discussion themed “Not Angry, Empowered” featuring prominent San Antonio Business Women.  The panel participants were Dr. Belinda Richardson, Licensed Marriage and Family therapist who has been practicing since 1999 and in 2011 established her own private practice, Grace For Life Counseling and Consulting Associates; Lynnette Watkins, M.D.., M.B.A., FACS, FACHE, CPE, Tenet Health Care administrative veteran, fellowship-trained and board certified Ophthalmologist, and Chief Medical Officer for Baptist Health System; Michelle Scarver of Money Management, Ltd., Certified Specialist with over 30 years experience in the financial services industry as a CPA, a big -4 auditor, controller, portfolio manager and wealth advisor; Dyanne Sampson, Vice President of Procurement at VIA Metropolitan Transit and former Director of Procurement at Hampton Roads Transit in Norfolk, Virginia.

The Black Women’s Leadership Alliance (BWLA) was born out of the desire of a small group of women who saw a void in women’s leadership programs that specifically addressed the needs of Black business women who want to advance to higher ranks in corporate America.  BWLA is committed to addressing the needs of Black women by being the catalyst that encourages innovation, collaboration and sisterhood among Black women.  The organization also provides support and resources to Black women in business and professional women who seek to enhance their leadership skills through mentoring, advocacy and professional development

To become a member or learn more about the BWLA please visit www.bwla-texas.org or visit them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/bwlatx/.

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Hot Topics