Connect with us

Community

Remembering the 19 Soldiers of the 24th Infantry Regiment

Published

on

Nineteen black soldiers were hung on Dec. 11, 1917 in San Antonio. In spite of their military service, racial tensions took over their fate. However these men won’t be forgotten by the Bexar County Buffalo Soldiers Association.

The local organization recently voted to pay homage to the 19 soldiers of the 24th infantry regiment by placing a commemorative plaque or monument in the Buffalo Soldier Peace Park at 1602 Wyoming Street – not too far where the soldiers faced death.

Famed actor, author, and former Army Reserve Ambassador James McEachin and Civil Rights leader Pastor Kyev Tatum teamed up to get approval from the Bexas County Buffalo Soldiers Association to collaborate on erecting a monument in recognition of the century old court-martial of 113 black soldiers and 19 hanged in the Alamo City – the largest in military history.

According to the Texas Historical Commission, the condemned men were not told their fate until two days before their execution, nor was time permitted to appeal for clemency. Instead, the execution was hastily carried out before dawn at a secluded edge of Camp Travis along Salado Creek. Their request to be shot had been denied. The gallows upon which they were hanged were gone by the time the news broke to the public. To read the full story of what happened, go here.

“This unique opportunity to recognize and remember the black soldiers lost because that resisted tyranny, rejected injustices and revolted against mistreatment at the hands of law enforcement in Houston, Texas over 100 years ago is a dream come true,” says Pastor K.P. Tatum, president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Fort Worth and Pastor of the New Mount Rose Missionary Baptist Church, also in Fort Worth.

Pastor Tatum and McEachin, a Korean War Veteran and Purple Heart and Silver Star recipient, are also working together to produce an event at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington DC for next July 2019 in honor of the Buffalo Soldiers of America with special recognition given to the brave soldiers of the United States Army 24th Infantry Regiment.

“The US Senate and President George H.W. Bush declared July 28, 1992 as Buffalo Soldiers Day in America and it is only fitting that we honor them with a day at the new Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African-American History and Culture in 2019,” Pastor Tatum said.

The two events are designed to continue the journey towards justice for the black soldiers that will lead to a presidential pardon.

“We believe these soldiers were protecting the fundamental fairness of freedom for all of us very similar to the brave Americans who fought at the Alamo in San Antonio. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was right, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.’ You can not call the soldiers at the Alamo hereos without calling the men of the 24th Infantry Regiment heroes. They both stood up and resisted brutality, one foreign and the other domestic. Injustice is injustice. We are excited about the possibilities of honoring our faithful forefathers both in San Antonio and in Washington DC,” says Pastor Tatum.

Advertisements
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Community

Sharing Stories of Racial Discrimination

Published

on

By

San Antonio residents of color are invited to share personal stories of racial discrimination for the third annual HBCU Oral History Project, hosted at St. Philip’s College Feb. 15-17, from 9 AM to 5 PM in the Sutton Learning Center, 1801 Martin Luther King Dr.

The HBCU Truth & Reconciliation Oral History Project is an endeavor that uses the power of spoken and documented words to heal and create spiritual and social change. These stories and, the related research, will be used to inform policy changes within the political environment and spiritual changes from a grassroots and common person’s perspective.

Under the direction of Rev. Steve Miller, the Project’s founder, digitized oral history accounts will be gathered by the HBCU academy which includes; Huston-Tillotson University, Jarvis Christian College and Southwestern Christian College. Participating partner universities include, Austin Presbyterian, Baylor University and TCU.

Miller’s work has resulted in federal civil rights investigations by the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and the United States Department of Justice’s Community Services Division, primarily, within the Texas educational system. His work has brought increased equity to hiring processes, enlarged job opportunities, and fostered greater understanding of institutional partiality through education.

Miller has coordinated and won legal actions at the federal court level and has been the stimulus of rewrites of discipline policies, whose ends resulted in fewer minorities being exposed to and caught in the educational system’s disciplinary apparatus, which correlates highly with elevated juvenile justice and mass incarceration rates.

For more information, contact St. Philip’s Director of Student Success Dr. Angela McPherson Williams at (210) 486-2090, awilliams284@alamo.edu or Project Founder and Director Rev. Steve Miller at (713) 557-6520 – (512) 404-4800, stevemiller@usclo.com

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

Legendary Newsman Eugene Coleman passes

Published

on

By

From his obituary:

Eugene Coleman, Sr.  was born on February 3, 1921, in Ennis, Texas. He was one of six brothers and three sisters to the parents of Mr. John Latelasafale Coleman and Mrs. Beatrice Simms Coleman,  all who proceed him in death.

Coleman moved to San Antonio in the 1970’s. He accepted Christ at an early age and he attended Mt. Zion Baptist church under the leadership of Rev. Claude W. Black.

Coleman, a Civil Rights and community activist, begin his career as a photographer during his World War II service in the Air Force.  Coleman was co-founder of SNAP magazine with Mr. G. J. Sutton and Rev. Claude W. Black. Mr. Coleman served as editor to publish news that was often neglected by mainstream media. He was an entrepreneur of the only black photography studio in San Antonio,  located in St. Paul Square. Businessman of Snap house, a chicken stand at the corner of N. Hackberry and E. Houston street, just up the road from his Photography studio.

Coleman was married to Mrs. Doris Coleman, and to that Union they had one son, Eugene Coleman, Jr.  He was later united with Mrs. Birdie Mitchell Coleman, who preceded in death in 1999. Coleman was always working and supporting others like San Antonio Black History Collection, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Mario Marcel Salas Papers and SNAP News collection, he was always a businessman.

He leaves to cherish his memories son, Mr. Eugene Coleman, Jr. A long time special friend, Mrs. Hertha Black Grant, a devoted caretaker, Mrs. Juanita White. Very close friends Mr. and Mrs. Oscar L Vicks and Mr. and Mrs. Derick Williams. A host of relatives and friends.

For more details visit https://www.lewisfuneralhome.com/notices/EUGENE-COLEMANJR

 

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

VIA Transit Celebrates Freedom Rider

Published

on

By

VIA Metropolitan Transit and St. Philip’s College will team up to honor civil rights activist Rosa Parks on what would have been her 106th birthday, anchored by a vintage 1966 GM Dreamliner VIA bus that is a piece of San Antonio history.

Freedom Rider Barbara Bowie will speak about her experience, and Parks’ passion for education at 1 pm on Feb. 4 at the Turbon Student Center at St. Philip’s, 1801 Martin Luther King Drive. VIA will also announce a contribution to the Dr. Bowie Scholarship Foundation, in memory of Ms. Bowie’s late spouse Dr. J.R. Bowie, III.

Parks, “the mother of the freedom movement”, is widely known for not giving giving up her seat to a white bus rider during a time when black people were regulated to the back of the bus. The 40-foot VIA bus will be parked next to the Turbon Student Center from Feb. 4-8.

Parks rode the VIA bus in the city’s first MLK March 32 years ago in 1987. Special Rosa Parks Seats were installed in VIA buses in 2005, and every VIA bus (510) has a special yellow seat designated in honor of Rosa Parks. That year – 1987 – when Parks passed the campus was significant in that St. Philip’s College received its Historically Black College and University (HBCU) member institution designation from the federal government. Additionally, the vintage VIA bus carried a group of Freedom Riders as ceremonial passengers in the city’s recent 2019 MLK March.

For the operating hours of the display Feb. 4-8 and details on the Feb. 4 opening event, contact VIA.

All are welcome to attend the following 2019 Black History Month events, and visit the web page for updates:

*** = SPC Debut

++ = Paid Event

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Hot Topics