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More Shake Up at SAGE – Interim CEO Resigns

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In just two months time, one of the most revered nonprofits on the East Side has had a shake up.

First, longtime CEO Jackie Gorman departed in late September. Now, interim CEO Akeem Brown has also resigned. The San Antonio Business Journal reported Friday that Brown left the organization only after two months in his new position. According to his LinkedIn page, he’s been with SAGE for a little more than two years and previously served as its director of operations. Prior to joining SAGE, Brown worked with former Councilman Alan Warrick as a director of communication and policy. 

The recent turnover in executive staff at SAGE raises questions of who will lead the organization forward especially during a time when many investors are looking at the area for redevelopment.

Earlier this year, the San Antonio Express-News reported on Gorman and SAGE’s efforts to bring change to the East Side, which often gets stereotyped for having high crime statistics. It reported that during Gorman’s tenure, investors are seeing the area differently now to refurbishing homes and building retail shops.

In spite of SAGE’s efforts, it has drawn some criticism as well. A 2016 News 4 Trouble Shooters story questioned why SAGE and other organizations were slow to invest more grant money on the East Side. In 2014, a portion of the East Side was designated one of the nation’s first “promise zones,” which made it eligible for millions in federal grants.

To read the story on Gorman from BlackVideoNews, go here.

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1st African American USAA Chairman to Retire

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Retired U.S. Air Force Gen. Lester Lyles has announced the next USAA’s membership meeting in August will be the last as chairman.
Since 2004 General Lyles has been on USAA’s board of directors. He told members that he deeply appreciates their trust and thanked them “for your loyalty through the years” in a recent letter that was part of the annual membership report.

Born April 20, 1946 General Lyles is a former United States Air Force general, Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force, and Commander, Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. After retirement from the Air Force in 2003, he became a company director for General Dynamics, DPL Inc., KBR Incorporated, Precision Castparts Corp., MTC Technologies, Battelle Memorial Institute and USAA. Lyles is also a Trustee of Analytic Services and a Managing Partner of Four Seasons Ventures, LLC.

In 2017, Lyles earned $461,034 from his role as board chairman, up from $449,910 in 2016. In 2018, Lyles earned $458,499 in salary for the role, records show.

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Botswana’s First Skyscraper and Tallest Building

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Located in the capital city of Gaborone, Itowers is an establishment comprised of three buildings in total, with the tallest South Tower rising 28 levels above the ground – making it Botswana’s tallest building, an iconic landmark in the city. Located in the center of the city’s vibrant new Central Business District just 20 minutes away from the airport, this complex of condominiums, apartments, office and retail space is perfectly suited for businessmen, diplomats and tourists seeking comfortable temporary accommodations.
It’s also in close proximity to all major government offices, shopping malls, and tourist attractions including the Square Mart Shopping Centre (just 1.2 km or 3/4 mile away), and the Three Dikgosi Monument (also just 1.2 km or 3/4 mile away).

Itowers has 54 outstanding apartments comprising of: 36 Standard rooms, 6 Premium rooms 12 Premium Plus rooms, with balconies opening to city views. They have 2 paraplegic friendly rooms and 12 family rooms.

In addition, Itowers features an on-site stylish and contemporary restaurant called Table50Two, located on the 28th floor of the south tower. The beautiful outdoor setting is set in a loft-life lounge ambience with lounge sofas and breathtaking views of the city. The unique and world class menu is complemented by a comprehensive choice of wine and beverages. It is the highest dining venue in all of Botswana.

When built, the project not only made an impact on the city of Gaborone, but also to the livelihoods of everyone involved in this multi-million dollar project. A total of 4.8 million man hours, 3.5 million bricks, 28 400m3 of cement and millions more hopes and dreams went into designing, erecting and completing the landmark towers.

For more details about this property, visit http://room50two.com. To learn more about investing in other projects in Botswana, send an email to info@baryenlegacy.com

Botswana is a landlocked country in Southern Africa. Formerly the British protectorate of Bechuanaland, Botswana adopted its new name after becoming independent within the Commonwealth in 1966. Since then, it has been a representative republic, with a consistent record of uninterrupted democratic elections and the best perceived corruption ranking in Africa since at least 1998. It is currently Africa’s oldest continuous democracy.

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Beyonce Reportedly Made $300 Million From Her Uber Investment

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Uber went public last week and their shares have been plummeting ever since. Despite this, singer Beyonce has still managed to score a $300 million profit from her investment. Many are wondering how this is possible since Uber’s shares plunged during the first week, closing as low as 17% below its IPO price!

Well, according to The New York Times, Beyonce received $6 million in restricted stock units (RSUs) from Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick to perform at a private company event in Las Vegas in 2015.

Here’s a little bit of information about restricted stock units (RSU). It’s compensation issued by an employer to an employee in the form of company stock that are assigned a fair market value when they vest. Upon vesting, the stock units are considered income, and a portion of the shares is withheld to pay income taxes. The employee receives the remaining shares and can sell them at his or her discretion.

So, Beyonce, although not a regular employee of Uber, was in fact “an employee” temporarily when she performed at the company’s private event. While the exact value of the shares at the time is not known, it can be assumed that the value was around $20 to $25 per share.

But when Uber’s IPO initially debuted, it started trading at $42 per share. So, if she sold her shares immediately despite the IPO plummeting, she could have easily made $300 million or more from her shares.

Another win for the Beehive!

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