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Driving While Black goes High Tech

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The phrase “Driving While Black” has been used in both the public and private discourse relating to the Racial Profiling of Black motorists.The term rose to prominence in public discourse during the 1990s, in the wake of the War on Drugs, when it was brought to public knowledge that police stations across the country were intentionally targeting racial minorities to curb the trafficking and sale of drugs in the United States.For example, New Jersey released state documents in 2000 which showed police training memos instructing officers to make racial judgments in order to identify “Occupant Identifiers for a possible Drug Courier” on the highway.

The phrase was further magnified after the ruling of Whren v. United States (1996), when the Supreme Court of the United States unanimously ruled that police officers may stop any motor vehicle operator if any traffic violation has been observed.The case has been criticized by scholars for allowing too much subjectivity on the part of police officers to use racial bias as a justification for the stop.

Subsequent media coverage of the phrase “Driving While Black” since the 1990s has been expansive and more common.The phrase is often used in anecdotal accounts of racial profiling of motor vehicle operators as well as statistical and legal analyses of racial profiling, a notable example being the case of Tolan v. Cotton.

In 2014 Portland lawyers Melvin Oden-Orr and Marianne Hyland created an app named “Driving While Black” in which users can record police and alert people when they are stopped by police on the road. It also supplies users with information on how to handle a traffic stop, including their legal rights and “best practices” for “how to be safe.”The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) released a similar app called “Mobile Justice” in which users can record and upload videos to the ACLU office.

The phrase DWB was amplified in the scope of American public discourse through social media mediums in which African Americans can record police encounters and disseminate it to a large audience.’Driving While Black’ was invoked in the media following the recent deaths of Sandra Bland (d. 2015) and Philando Castile (d. 2016), both of whom were African Americans who were pulled over by police while driving.


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Beyonce Reportedly Made $300 Million From Her Uber Investment

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Uber went public last week and their shares have been plummeting ever since. Despite this, singer Beyonce has still managed to score a $300 million profit from her investment. Many are wondering how this is possible since Uber’s shares plunged during the first week, closing as low as 17% below its IPO price!

Well, according to The New York Times, Beyonce received $6 million in restricted stock units (RSUs) from Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick to perform at a private company event in Las Vegas in 2015.

Here’s a little bit of information about restricted stock units (RSU). It’s compensation issued by an employer to an employee in the form of company stock that are assigned a fair market value when they vest. Upon vesting, the stock units are considered income, and a portion of the shares is withheld to pay income taxes. The employee receives the remaining shares and can sell them at his or her discretion.

So, Beyonce, although not a regular employee of Uber, was in fact “an employee” temporarily when she performed at the company’s private event. While the exact value of the shares at the time is not known, it can be assumed that the value was around $20 to $25 per share.

But when Uber’s IPO initially debuted, it started trading at $42 per share. So, if she sold her shares immediately despite the IPO plummeting, she could have easily made $300 million or more from her shares.

Another win for the Beehive!

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What If? See the Future of Smart Cities at CES 2019

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OJO Electric Scooter

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The OJO Electric Scooter will be introducing a new model for CES 2019, and we are truly excited for it!  This newly designed personal light electric vehicle serves as a great urban solution to inner city commuting.  The creators of the OJO Electric Scooter wanted to build an equivalent to Tesla and Apple in relation to inner city mobility, and although this sounds like a far-reaching ideal, Black Video News can assure you this has been accomplished.  With its aesthetically and functionally pleasing design coupled with its zero-carbon emission framework, OJO has met its goal in capturing the hearts of the urban millennial who wants to save the world and make it to work in the most timely and fashionable manner possible.

The OJO Electric has a range of 25 miles per charge, which is leading among this industry.  This is done through its patented lithium ion battery that has built in built into the ferrying, so you’ll always be able to charge it wherever as an outlet accessible!  Along with this, the OJO electric scooter’s patented aluminum frame has the listed capacity of 300 pounds, but some suggest it has the capacity to hold up to 400 pounds.  A key feature of this vehicle is its patented design, inspired by the surfboard!  The curvature of the OJO Electric Scooter, allows it to be easily stood on, riding the wave of innovative technology, or you can sit in comfort and cruise around the city. Other notable features of the OJO Electric scooter include its dual Bluetooth speakers, LED lighting, and the fact that you do not need a license to operate this vehicle.

 

Black Video News is excited for the new model of the OJO electric scooter set to be displayed at CES in 2019.  These immerging transportation technologies are transformative now and will be pivotal in times to come.

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