Connect with us

Editorial

Confederate Statues Tell a Story – an Ugly One

Published

on

By Mario Salas

Confederate statues tell a story. The story these despicable symbols carry is one of trying to keep the walking dead ideology of white supremacy alive—trying to keep racism alive even after these traitors lost a war that killed hundreds of thousands all for the cause of slavery and injustice. It is no surprise that right after the Supreme Court case of Plessy vs. Ferguson, southern bigots and racist lunatics sought to keep their evilness alive by erecting statues at a time when they were trying to enforce Jim Crow laws. All of the lies generated by the former slave owners, and their brainwashed ancestors, were aimed at supporting segregation and white supremacy through their worn out method of changing the subject. They changed the subject by claiming the Civil War was about “Northern Aggression” and all sorts of propaganda. However, they messed themselves up by admitting that the Civil War was mostly about slavery in their own words in their Articles of Secession. Confederate statues tell a story, but it is not the true story of racism and slavery.

Confederate statues tell a story. White supremacy has always found a way to stick around. First slavery was employed to control Native Americans and finally black people, and when that was lost in a civil war southern racists were not finished yet. This is a case were the losers were actually allowed to write their own history because the North abandoned the cause of human rights for blacks. Racist northerners and racist southerners conspired to deny civil and human rights for black Americans and others. The former slave owners were allowed to convert slavery to a new form that could only be described as “slavery by another name.” They did this by passing vagrancy laws that simply made it illegal not to have a job—they then began arresting blacks on false charges to create another racist system. They did that all the way up until the 1940s and beyond, by kidnapping blacks to work on farms and in coal mines by using the legal system.  Black unemployment and the lack of any help from the North, and from federal and state governments, to aid people coming out of slavery simply was not present after Reconstruction.

The 13th Amendment was sabotaged. Read it! “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” What you have to notice is the trick Northerners and Southerners used by wording the amendment to satisfy the former slave owners which allowed them to put blacks back into slavery by accusing them of a crime, whether it was true or made-up. The word “except” is the story those Confederate statues tell. After the Civil War, former slave owners and the legal system conspired to convict blacks, mostly on invented charges using enhanced criminal penalties. Their principle weapon were the  vagrancy laws which all of the former slave-owning states adopted. In each generation, white supremacy has sought to hold on by using new tactics to achieve the goal of keeping people that still believe they are white in positions of power. Confederate statues tell this story.

White supremacy was deemed necessary as an important ingredient in the formation of the United States from its very beginnings. In order to secure its place as an operative policy, new forms began to take shape in the form of segregation. Jim Crow law was instituted across the nation in order to keep the supposed idea that whites were superior. Restaurants, theatres, bus stations, schools, graveyards, swimming pools, and other public spaces were deemed “white only.” They put up their racist statues to enshrine this madness but claimed it was just to honor their dead—their dead fought for a cause that was a bad as the cause of Hitler, and Confederate statues tell that story. Today it is no longer an accepted norm to openly use “race” as a way to discriminate so another tactic was employed, “colorblind” foolery, and a “War on Drugs” enhanced with a “War on Crime,” and Confederate statues tell a story. These racially inspired tactics were, and still are, a method to extend white supremacy. So nowadays, they use the last bastion of overt discrimination, the criminal justice system. The criminal justice system is an interesting extension of slavery and white supremacy, for it punishes crimes differently for drug use based on race and harsher sentences for people of color across the board.  The criminal justice system is a well-disguised and well-oiled system of racist social control that mimics Jim Crow. This is how racism changes from one generation to the next and Confederate statues tell this story.

One cannot claim that efforts to control crime are simply unconnected to racist control, for all of the evidence reveals that this idea is wrong. Sentencing policies that allowed harsher sentences to be given for crack cocaine is a good example. The so-called “War on Drugs,” launched like the good ship lollypop in 1982 by Ronald Reagan, was publicized to the hilt by highlighting all kinds of “crack babies.” All of this was a timed plot that was conjoined with the CIA moves in Latin America to smuggle drugs into the United States and many of you all have simply succumbed to the propaganda. The United States needed drug smugglers to fight leftist guerillas in Nicaragua, and hence America’s black community was the dumping ground for the drugs which augmented the fake call for a “drug war.” We know from Senate Hearings at the time that Oliver North was a drug smuggler who allowed drugs into the black community much like racist “Indian agents” allowed alcohol onto reservations.  In this way, the poor, blacks and other minorities could be “legally” targeted for arrest.

Advertisements
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Editorial

Actor/Comedian Kevin Hart Suffers Car Crash Injuries

Published

on

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Editorial

Not Seeking Re-election

Published

on

In an editorial on Rep. Will Hurd’s page he announced it’s time to serve his country in a different way.

August 1, 2019 Editorial (https://hurd.house.gov)

There are many reasons why I love America. I have learned over my three terms in Congress, by representing people that voted for me, didn’t vote for me or didn’t vote at all, that America is better than the sum of its parts. Serving people of all walks of life has shown me that way more unites our country than divides us. This understanding has allowed me to win elections many people thought I couldn’t, especially when the political environment was overwhelmingly against my party.

In this experiment called America we strive to create a more perfect union. Our founding principle of a right to free speech has given us the freedom to disagree, and the resulting competition of ideas has produced policies tackling a variety of problems. As has happened many times throughout our history, we now face generational defining challenges at home and abroad.

We are in a geopolitical competition with China to have the world’s most important economy. There is a global race to be the leader in artificial intelligence, because whoever dominates AI will rule the world. We face growing cyberattacks every day. Extreme poverty, lack of economic opportunity and violence in Central America is placing unbearable pressure on our borders. While Congress has a role in these issues, so does the private sector and civil society.

After reflecting on how best to help our country address these challenges, I have made the decision to not seek reelection for the 23rd Congressional District of Texas in order to pursue opportunities outside the halls of Congress to solve problems at the nexus between technology and national security.

I left a job I loved in the CIA as an undercover officer to meet what I believed to be a need for new leadership in Congress on intelligence and national security matters. I wanted to help the Intelligence Community in a different way by bringing my knowledge and experience to Congress. I’m leaving the House of Representatives to help our country in a different way. I want to use my knowledge and experience to focus on these generational challenges in new ways. It was never my intention to stay in Congress forever, but I will stay involved in politics to grow a Republican Party that looks like America.

As the only African American Republican in the House of Representatives and as a Congressman who represents a 71% Latino district, I’ve taken a conservative message to places that don’t often hear it. Folks in these communities believe in order to solve problems we should empower people not the government, help families move up the economic ladder through free markets not socialism and achieve and maintain peace by being nice with nice guys and tough with tough guys. These Republican ideals resonate with people who don’t think they identify with the Republican Party. Every American should feel they have a home in our party.

While I have 17 months left in my term, I’m very proud of the last 55. There were times when it was fun and times when it wasn’t. When people were mad, it was my job to listen. When people felt hopeless, it was my job to care. When something was broken, it was my job to find out how to fix it.

When border patrol agents weren’t getting the tools they needed to do their job, I stepped in to help. When I found an opportunity to expose more students to computer science, I partnered with non-profits to train local teachers to incorporate coding into math class. I made sure taxpayer money was used more efficiently by changing how the government purchases IT goods and services.

It was never about the size nor difficulty nor sexiness of the problem; It was about making a difference. My philosophy has been simple. Be honest. Treat people with respect. Never shy away from a fight. Never accept “no” or the status quo and never hesitate to speak my mind.

NoTwo centuries ago, I would have been counted as three-fifths of a person, and today I can say I’ve had the honor of serving three terms in Congress. America has come a long way and we still have more to do in our pursuit of a more perfect union. However, this pursuit will stall if we don’t all do our part. When I took the oath of office after joining the CIA, I swore to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all its enemies. I took the same oath on my first day in Congress. This oath doesn’t have a statute of limitations. I will keep fighting to ensure the country I love excels during what will be a time of unprecedented technological change. I will keep fighting to make certain we successfully meet these generational challenges head on. I will keep fighting to remind people why I love America: that we are neither Republican nor Democrat nor Independent; We are better than the sum of our parts.

Advertisements
Continue Reading

Community

The Discussion w The Writer Fred Blacks in the Media: Have We Made Good Progress?

Published

on

By

Advertisements

Continue Reading

Hot Topics