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Sisters from AARP: A digital newsletter celebrating gen-x and baby boomer

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WASHINGTON — AARP has launching “Sisters from AARP,” a new digital newsletter celebrating Gen-X and Baby Boomer African American women. The weekly newsletter, reaching subscribers every Tuesday, features entertaining, informative and inspirational content created for black women by black women.

“Sisters from AARP is created specifically for Gen X and Boomer black women to offer fashion, health, career, and relationship advice in a fun, relatable voice that speaks to them,” said Myrna Blyth, Senior Vice President and Editorial Director, AARP Media.

“Our writers and social media team members are opening a space where we black women can share real talk and advice about what matters to us,” said Editor In Chief Claire McIntosh.

“This is a meaningful milestone in AARP’s continuing commitment to authentically, intentionally engage and support diverse audiences,” said Edna Kane Williams, Senior Vice President, Multicultural Leadership. “African American women are thirsting for information about how to live our best lives. AARP is committed to being that go-to resource.”

The Sisters from AARP newsletter will include:

Culture, Beauty, Health Info: Featured stories cover everything from strategies to maintain the ageless allure black women pride themselves on; to a writer’s triumph over stubborn pounds after she uncovered reasons midlife weight loss is harder; to a surprisingly personal look at the connection between sisterhood and mental health.

Current Trends/Travel: Read Sisters from AARP to learn the hottest upcoming events, festivals and shows. City guides feature tips from local black influencers.

Playlists: Sisters from AARP celebrates Hip Hop’s 45th anniversary with 45 dope and danceable tracks.

Career/Money Advice: Articles like “How to Get Paid Like a White Dude” can spark a conversation for career advancement. Subscribers can also learn how to find the side hustle that’s right for them.

For more information, visit www.sistersletter.com.

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Are You San Antonio’s Next Queen of Soul?

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ARE YOU THE NEXT QUEEN OF SOUL?

Are you a Young lady between the ages of 18 and 24 years old?

Are you a Young lady who is a student in good academic standing?

Are you interested in scholarship money?

Are you a Young Lady who will represent the San Antonio Queen of Soul, Inc. and our community with dignity, composure and grace?

Are you a resident or student of the greater San Antonio, Texas  and surrounding area (within 30 miles)?

Are you a Young Lady in good physical health and of good moral character?

Are you a Young Lady who can complete the Queen of Soul 2020-2021 soon?  

Are you a Young Lady who will be available for the following?

  • 4 to 6 weeks of Queen of Soul Contestant Rehearsals starting in early Feburary?
  • March 10, 2020 Queen of Soul Pageant Reception?
  • March 14, 2020 Queen of Soul Pageant?
  • Fiesta 2020 events?

If so then YOU could be the 2020 – 2021 Queen of Soul!

Please go to the following website for the application and other details:

San Antonio Queen of Soul, Inc.  https://www.saqueenofsoul.org/

CONTACT:   QOS Contestant Coordinators

Dori Brown and Zekalia  Washington

Cell: 210-570-9295

QOSPREZ@gmail.com

https://www.saqueenofsoul.org/
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Black Teen Banned From Graduation Because of His Hair

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Mont Belvieu, TX — Deandre Arnold, a high school student from Texas, is reportedly being discriminated against because of his hair style of choice. His school, Barbers Hill High School in the city of Mont Belvieu, has suspended him and banned him from participating in his own graduation unless he cuts his locks to a shorter length.

School officials claim their decision is based on their long-standing policy wherein “no dress code policy that prohibits any cornrow or any other method of wearing of the hair, our policy limits the length. It’s been that way for 30 years,” Superintendent Greg Poole told KHOU 11.

However, activists believe that it is yet again another case of racial discrimination.

“The dress code is designed by white people for white people and is damaging to Black bodies,” Black Lives Matter activist Ashton Woods said.

“This is a Black and white issue, Deandre (and) his family should not have to go through this. But I expect it from a board that has zero diversity,” stated Gary Monroe, with the United Urban Alumni Association.

A number of activists supported Deandre and his family in their discussion with the Barbers Hill school board, hoping to come to a favorable resolution. They thought that the issue was an insignificant obstruction to the teen’s education that might also be experienced by others.

“We’re here for Deandre, but it’s about more than that, this is about all the other Deandres that could come through Barbers Hill,” Sandy Arnold, Deandre’s mother said.

Moreover, Deandre’s family, together with their supporters, are planning to take the case to federal court if the school wouldn’t come up with a resolution 48 hours after their meeting.

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Continuing The Legacy

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CONTINUING KING’S LEGACY OF JUSTICE, PEACE AND EQUALITY!

The City of San Antonio’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission will continue its commemoration of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1st March for Justice organized by the late Rev. Dr. Raymond “R.A.” Callies, Sr., a San Antonio teacher and pastor. Rev. Callies began the March in 1968 to call attention to the need for basic infrastructure on the east side. His efforts have resulted in what has become one of the largest commemorative marches for Dr. King in the United States and possibly the world. After the death of Dr. King, he worked tirelessly to have a statue of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. erected in what is now MLK Plaza located at the heart of the eastside on New Braunfels Street. Since then, community members along with thousands of others who travel across the country to participate, have gathered each year in increasing numbers to reflect on their own Dream of Justice, Peace and Equality to all in America.

Improving the quality of life for all people was the dream of Dr. King and Rev. Callies. The MLK Commission seeks to continue their work and legacy by offering educational and empowering events throughout the month of January each year. If you would like to support the mission of the City of San Antonio, MLK Commission, please participate by attending the various events provided by the Commission. Your financial support is also needed to help in presenting Scholarships to deserving area students. Please contact the City of San Antonio’s MLK, Jr. Commission for more informtation.

The signature event, the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. March, is scheduled for Monday, January 20, 2020. The march will begin at 10:00 a.m. at the MLK Academy located at 3501 MLK Drive and end at Pittman-Sullivan Park, 1101 Iowa. 

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